Goldberg Coins and Collectibles



Sale 82

The Fall Manuscript, Collectibles, Stamp and Space Memorabilia Auction


Historic Documents/Manuscripts
 
 
Lot Photo Description Realized
Lot 535
Adams, John (1735-1836) 2nd President of the United States (1797-1801). Autograph letter signed as President, one page, 9¾ x 8", Philadelphia, Feb. 22, 1799. To "Fr. Adr. Vanderkemp at Oldenbarneveldt. State of New York." In full: "Sir, I have just received your favour of the 20th of January: and am sensibly touched with the Remembrance of our learned and ingenious Friend whom I saw at the Red [Golden] Lyon in Leyden. I thank you for his Poems. Whether you will find Purchasers for the Edition of his juvenile Poems you meditate I cannot say. My Country I fear do not sufficiently attend to Greek and Latin after they leave Colledge - perhaps not there. I am with much Esteem Sir your most obedient John Adams." Fine condition.

In 1780, John Adams became U.S. Minister to the Netherlands and gained early recognition of the fledgling United States, as well as much-needed loans. While there Adams made friends with intellectuals who were sympathetic to the American cause, among them Francis Adrian Van der Kemp, who Adams described to Thomas Jefferson as "the most elegant writer in the Dutch language." Adams spent time in the Golden Lion inn in Leyden with his new friends. In 1781, Van der Kemp published "A Collection of Tracts Relative to the United States," an espousal of the American cause, which earned him letters of introduction from Madison, Franklin, and Washington. In 1788, he left the Netherlands and settled in New York at Oldenbarneveldt, where he met Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, and Alexander Hamilton, among others. He shared Washington's interest in scientific agriculture and visited Washington at Mount Vernon.

In Leyden, Adams and Van der Kemp knew Laurens von Santen, who had written a children's book in Latin, Carmina Juvenilia. In 1799, Van der Kemp wrote to Adams, suggesting the publication of this work. Adams had reservations about the project, because he felt his countrymen weren't well versed in the classics, a situation which he greatly regretted, because Latin and Greek were of paramount importance to him. He felt that American democracy descended directly from its Roman and Greek counterparts, and his speeches abound with classical references. In 1779, when John Quincy Adams was studying for entrance to Harvard, John Adams read with him Aristotle, Plutarch, Lucian and Homer, as well as Horace, Virgil and Suetonius, and in John Adams' correspondence with Thomas Jefferson in their later years, the two men, who had been friends, then enemies, then friends again, would sometimes discuss the best translation of a phrase in Latin or Greek. An excellent letter from a truly learned man.
Estimated Value $7,500 - 10,000.
The Arden Family Holdings of Beverly Hills.

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Realized
$6,000
Lot 536
Adams, John. Signature as President, 7/8 x 5¼" (Washington), 1800. Cut from a vellum document, with "[Pr]esident" visible at left. On the verso is the signature of Secretary of War James McHenry, and the date "1800". A beautiful signature, boldly signed. Light toning, else fine. Accompanied by an engraving of Adams by H.B. Hall Jr. from a painting by Gilbert Stuart.
Estimated Value $2,000 - 3,000.
Joseph L. Baldwin Collection; purchased from Profiles in History, March 1, 1993.

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Realized
$2,640
Lot 537
Adams, John. Autograph document signed in the third person in the text, one page, 4 x 6", Braintree, Dec. 22, 1763. Being a receipt written by Adams: "Braintree Decr 22nd 1763 Recd of John Adams Four Pounds Twelve Shillings of lawful Money in Part for an action commenced in favour of Capt Thatcher very scarce Elijah Beldus." The receipt is signed by Jonathan Webb, below which is a notation, "All but the signature in the hand writing of John Adams. C.F.A.," written by Charles Francis Adams (1807-86), editor, politician, and diplomat who was the son of John Quincy Adams and grandson of John Adams. He wrote a biography about his grandfather. Matted with a 4¼ x 3¼" engraving of John Adams and framed to an overall size of 21¼ x 15¼".
Estimated Value $2,000 - 3,000.
The Arden Family Holdings of Beverly Hills; ex The Rosenbach Company.

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Realized
$1,440
Lot 538
Adams, John. Autograph closing and signature, "I am Yr: Affectionate Father J. Adams," on a 2" x 5" slip of paper, n.p., n.d. From a letter to one of his children. Matted with a steel engraving of Adams and elaborately framed to an overall size of 36" x 30½". Fine condition.
Estimated Value $500 - 700.
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Realized
$1,980
Lot 539
Adams, John Quincy (1767-1848) 6th President of the United States (1825-1829).

Eloquent autograph letter signed as a member of the House of Representatives (where he served after leaving the presidency from 1831 until his death in 1848), 4pp, 10 x 8", Washington, February 19, 1839. Archival fold repairs, else fine. To renowned actor and Shakespearean scholar James H. Hackett (1800-1871), who became the first U.S. actor to appear abroad in 1826 when he performed at Covent Garden. He is best known for his performances in the role of Shakespeare's Falstaff. Both John Quincy Adams and Abraham Lincoln corresponded with him about Shakespeare's characters. The Philip Hone (1780-1851) to whom Adams refers was a wealthy, cultured merchant who was mayor of New York City from 1825 to 1826. He was friends with most of the political, artistic and scientific leaders of his day and was known for the diary he kept, which included a detailed account of the events of the period.

Adams writes, in full: "Dear Sir, I return herewith your Tragedy of Hamlet with many thanks for the perusal of your manuscript notes, which indicate how thoroughly you have delved into the bottomless mine of Shakespeare's genius. I well remember the conversation more than seven years by gone, at Mr. Philip Hone's hospitable table, where at the casual introduction of the name of Hamlet the Dane, my enthusiastic admiration of the inspired (muse inspired) Bard of Avon commenced in childhood before the down had darkened my lip, and continued, through five of the seven ages of the drama of life, gaining upon the judgment as it loses to the imagination, seduced me to expatiate at a most intellectual and lovely convivial board, upon my views of the character of Hamlet until I came away ashamed of having engrossed an undue proportion of the conversation to myself. That my involuntary effusions and diffusions of mind on that occasion were indulgently viewed by Mr. Hone, so as to have remained with kindness upon his memory to this day is a source of much gratification to me, and still more pleasing is it to me that he should have thought any of the observations which fell from me at that time worthy of being mentioned to you.

I look upon the Tragedy of Hamlet as the Master Piece of Drama-The Master Piece of Shakespeare-I had almost said the Master Piece of the Human mind. But I have never committed to writing the analysis of the considerations upon which this deliberate judgment has been formed. At the table of Mr. Hone I could give nothing but outlines and etchings. I can give no more now, snatching as I do from the morning lamp, to commune with a lover and worthy Representative of Shakespeare upon the glories of the immortal Bard.

What is Tragedy? It is an imitative representation of human action and passion to purify the heart of the spectator, through the instrumentality of terror and pity. This in substance is the definition of Aristotle; and Pope's most beautiful lines, in the prologue to Cato, are but an expansion of the same idea. Hamlet-- is the personification of Man, in the prime of life, with a mind cultivated by the learning acquirable at an University, combining intelligence and sensibility, in their highest degree, within a step of the highest station attainable upon earth, crushed to extinction, by the pressure of calamities inflicted not by nature but against nature - not by physical but by moral evil. Hamlet is the Heart and Soul of Man, in all their perfection and all their frailty, in agonizing conflict with human crime also in its highest preeminence of guilt. Hamlet is all Heart, and all Soul. His ruling passions are filial affection, youthful love--manly ambition. His commanding principles are filial duty--generous friendship--Love disappointed and subdued ambition and Life sacrificed to avenge his father.

Hamlet's right to the throne has been violated, and his darkest suspicions roused by the marriage of his mother with his uncle so speedily succeeding his father's death. His love is first trammelled by conflicting pride of his birth and station operating upon his ambition, and although he has 'made many tenders of his affection' to Ophelia, and 'hath importun'd her with love in honorable fashion,' yet he has made no proposal of marriage to her--he has promised her nothing but love and, cautioned both by her brother and her father, she meets the advances of Hamlet with repulsion. Instead of attributing this to its true cause, he thinks she spurns his tenderness. In his enumeration of the sufferings which stimulate to suicide he names 'the pangs of despised Love' and his first experiment of assumed madness, is made upon her. He treats her with a revolting mixture of ardent passion of gross indelicacy and of rudeness, little short of brutality--at one moment, he is worshiping at her feet, at the next insulting her with coarse indecency--at the third, taunting her with sneering and sarcastic advice to go to a nunnery. And is this the language of splendid intellect, in alliance with acute feeling? Aye, under the insupportable pressure of despised love; combined with a throne lost by usurpation--a father murdered by a mother and an uncle; an incestuous marriage between the criminals, and the apparition from the eternal world, of his father's Spirit, commanding him to avenge the dead.

The revelation from the ghost caps the climax of calamity. It unsettles that ardent and meditative mind--you see it in the tone of levity instantly assumed upon the departure of the 'perturbed Spirit.' You see it in the very determination to 'put on an antic disposition.' It is the expedient of a deadly, but irresolute purpose. He will execute the command of his father, but he will premeditate the time, the place, the occasion, and to fore-arrange the most convenient opportunity, will feign occasional madness with intervals of clear and steady rational conversation. And thus it is that 'the native hue of resolution is sicklied o'er with the pale cast of thought.'

This perpetual action and reaction between the mind and the heart; the feeling spurring him on, and the reflection holding him back, constitute that most admirable portrait of human nature in its highest estate, little lower than the angels, little above the Hottentot of the African cape, which pervades every part of the character and conduct of Hamlet. The habitual turn of his mind is to profound meditation. He reflects upon life, upon death, upon the nature of man, upon the physical composition of the Universe. He indulges in minute criticism upon the performance of the players; he reads and comments upon a satire of Juvenal; he quibbles with a quibbling grave-digger--commemorates the convivial attractions of an old jovial table companion, whose bones the good man Delver turns up in digging the grave for Ophelia, and philosophizes upon the dust of imperial Caesar, metamorphosed into the bung of a beer barrel. During all this time he is charged with the command of his father, risen from the dead, to take the life of his murderer to execute divine justice in the punishment of his crime. He is firmly resolved to execute this command Has frequent opportunities for the execution of it which he suffers to escape him; and is constantly reproaching himself for his delays. He shrewdly detects and ingeniously disconcerts the practices of the murderers against his life, discloses to his mother his knowledge of her guilt. Kills Polonius most rashly pretending to kill a rat, and intending to kill the king, whom he supposes to be the person behind the arras, and to have been there listening and overhearing his terrible expostulations with his mother. When he discovers that the person he has killed was, not the king but Polonius, instead of compunction and remorse, he begins by a cruel joke upon the dead body and finishes by an apologetic burst of indignation at the wretched, rash, intruding fool, who had hidden himself behind the arras, to overhear his interview with his mother. Yet the man whom he has killed is the father of Ophelia, whom he loves to distraction; and whose madness and death are immediate consequences of this murder of her father. Shakespeare has taken care not to bring Hamlet and Ophelia into the presence of each other after this event. He takes no notice at the grave-digging scene, that the grave over which he so pathetically and humorously disserts upon the bones of Yorick, the kings jester, was about to receive the corpse of Ophelia. Afterwards, at the funeral scene, he treats Laertes as roughly, but finally apologizes to him and desires him to attribute his violence and unkind treatments to his madness. The reasoning faculty of Hamlet is at once sportive, sorrowful, indignant and melancholy. His reflections always take the tinge of the passion under which he is labouring, but his conduct is always governed by the impulse of the moment. Hence his madness as you have remarked is sometimes feigned, and sometimes real. His feigned madness, Polonius, without seeing through it, perceives has method in it. His real madness is towering Passion-- transient, momentary, the furor brevis which was the ancient definition of anger. It overwhelms at once the brightest Genius, the soundest Reason, and the kindliest heart that ever was exhibited in combination upon the Stage. It is Man in the ideal perfection of his intellectual and moral nature, struggling with calamity beyond his power to bear, inflicted by the crime of his fellow man--struggling with agonizing energies against it--sinking under it, to extinction. What can be more terrific? What can be more piteous?

This is the hasty outline of my view of the character of Hamlet. I regret that time will not allow me to fill the canvas with lights and shades borrowed from the incidents and Dialogue of the Play. But after bestowing so much of my own tediousness upon you, I can only repeat my thanks for the perusal of your own very ingenious comments upon this incomparable Tragedy; and add the assurance of my best wishes, for your health and happiness, and of my cordial sympathies with your devotion to the memory of the immortal Bard. John Quincy Adams." The content clearly exhibits Adams' renowned intellect and passion for the arts. James Henry Hackett (1800-1871) became the first U.S. actor to appear abroad in 1826 when he performed at Covent Garden. He is best known for his performances as Shakespeare's Falstaff. Both John Quincy Adams and Abraham Lincoln corresponded with him about Shakespeare's characters.
Estimated Value $15,000 - 20,000.
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Lot 540
Adams, John Quincy. Partly-printed document signed ("J Q Adams") as Secretary of State, 2pp., 13½" x 10½", Washington, March 7, 1822. Being a U. S. Passport, No. 197, issued to William B. Rogers (physicist, educator and founder of MIT). Rogers, age 21, has also signed ("Wm. B. Rogers"). The document is separated at the horizontal fold and passport stamp cancellations on verso have caused some bleed-through to the front of the document. Light foxing and toning. Boldly penned. Attractively matted with an image of Adams and a lead cast of an 1825 John Quincy Adams Silver Indian Peace Medal; framed to an overall size of 36 x 24". Fine condition.
Estimated Value $1,000 - 1,500.
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Realized
$1,440
Lot 541
Adams, John Quincy (1767-1848) 6th President of the United States (1825-1829). Autograph document signed ("J.Q. Adams") as Congressman, 3¾ x 6¾", n.p., n.d. Light toning, else fine.

Two long lines and signature cut from the conclusion of a request to Congress that their "Hall" be used by a silk convention: "The Subscribers request that the use of the Hall may be granted for the purposes above mentioned." The petition was signed by nine other members of Congress. Adams failed to win a second presidential term in 1828 but won a congressional seat to represent a district that encompassed southeastern Massachusetts. Shortly before his death in the U.S. Capitol in 1848, Adams said he viewed his 17 years as a member of the House as the highlight of his long life of public service.
Estimated Value $600 - 800.
Joseph L. Baldwin Collection; purchased from Charles Hamilton, December 9, 1991.

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Lot 542
Arthur, Chester A (1830-1886) 21st President of the United States (1881-1885). Autograph letter signed ("C.A. Arthur"), one page, 82 Nassau St. (New York City), July 22, 1871. To Jas. Terwilliger Esq: "I hope there will be no unnecessary delay in the appointment of Mr. Cox which has been a long time promised. Fine. Arthur is scarce in autograph letters signed.

Arthur entered politics as the protégé of Roscoe Conkling, the corrupt leader of the New York City Republican political machine. At Conkling's urging, Arthur was appointed Collector of the Port of New York by President Grant, but was fired by President Hayes in 1878 on suspicion of corruption and patronage. He was nominated for Vice President in 1880 in the hope of conciliating the followers of Grant and the New York machine. When he unexpectedly became President upon Garfield's assassination, Arthur turned over a new leaf and backed civil service reform, reorganized the Cabinet, and prosecuted political associates accused of post office graft.
Estimated Value $600 - 800.
Joseph L. Baldwin Collection; purchased from Edward N. Bomsey, December 18, 1992.

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Realized
$1,020
Lot 543
Buchanan, James (1791-1868) 15th President of the United States (1857-1861); Secretary of State under James K. Polk.

Manuscript quotation signed as Secretary of State, one page, Washington, late 1848. Being an excerpt from a letter, meant for publication, that President James K. Polk had Secretary of State Buchanan send to William V. Voorhees, the on-site agent of the United States in California, containing the official statement of policy of the United States government and conveying to the people of California the lofty views of President Polk respecting their condition and prospects.

The excerpt reads: "Whilst the other nations of the world are distracted by domestic dissensions, and are involved in a struggle between the privileges of the few and the rights of the many, Heaven has blessed our happy land with a Government which secures equal rights to all our citizens, and has produced Peace, Happiness and Contentment throughout our borders. It has combined Liberty with Order, and all the sacred and indefeasible rights of the citizens with the strictest observance of law…." Written in brackets after this is "From the letter of Mr. Buchanan, Secretary of State of the U.S. conveying to the people of California the views of President Polk respecting their condition and prospects.--October 7, 1848." The quotation is signed by James Buchanan and a scroll at lower left has "Signature autograph."

California became the property of the United States after the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, signed in February 1848 (effective May 30) ended the Mexican-American War (1846-48). After Mexican authority lapsed, the U.S. government did not step immediately into the breach and Californians were concerned about their status. On August 14, 1848, President Polk signed "An act to establish certain postal routes" and "to make arrangements for the establishment of post offices and for the transmission, receipt and conveyance of letters in Oregon and California." William V. Voorhees was named the U.S. agent for this purpose

With the discovery of gold on the American River near Sacramento on January 24, 1848, came a huge increase in population and a pressing need for civil government. The Gold Rush hastened California's entry into the Union as the 31st state on 9 September 1850.

The body of this manuscript was written for Buchanan by Adam J. Glossbrenner, who was Clerk of the State Department during Buchanan's tenure there. Glossbrenner was later Sergeant-at-Arms for the House of Representatives and then Buchanan's private secretary.
Estimated Value $1,000 - 1,500.
The Arden Family Holdings of Beverly Hills.

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Realized
$4,080
Lot 544
Buchanan, James. Autograph letter signed as U.S. senator from Pennsylvania, one page plus holograph integral address leaf, 10 x 8", Lancaster, June 22, 1839. To Samuel McCamant Esq., who was a U.S. senator from Virginia at that time:

"Allow me to introduce to you my friend James A. Caldwell Esquire, a senator from this county, in our State Legislature. You will find him to be entirely congenial to you in politicks, as well as a very amiable & excellent man. Any attention which you may bestow upon him will be gratefully acknowledged by your friend. Very respectfully / James Buchanan." Beautifully scripted and signed.
Estimated Value $800 - 1,000.
Joseph L. Baldwin Collection; purchased from Gary Hendershott, March 3, 1992.

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Realized
$870
Lot 545
Buchanan, James. Partly-printed document signed as President, one page, 10 x 8", Washington, Feb. 24, 1858. Authorizing and directing that the U.S. seal be affixed to "the Envelope of a letter addressed to His Excellency the President of Guatemala accrediting Beverly L. Clarke as Minister Resident of the United States." Light toning; small edge tears do not touch the text or the boldly-penned signature. Matted with a biographical plaque and an engraving of Buchanan and framed to an overall size of 16¾ x 20¾". Ready for display. Clarke served as minister resident to Guatemala until March 17, 1860.
Estimated Value $600 - 800.
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Realized
$408
Lot 546
Buchanan, James. Partly-printed document signed as Secretary of State, one page, 13" x 10", Washington, February 26, 1849. Being a United States of America Passport, No. 2833, issued to "Lewis B. Coffin". Department of State seal present. Moderate foxing and staining. Boldly signed. Matted with a steel engraving of Buchanan and framed to an overall size of 25½" x 29¼". Very good.
Estimated Value $500 - 750.
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Realized
$443
Lot 547
Bush, George H. W (1924 -) 41st President of the United States (1989-1993). Book signed ("George Bush"), being a first edition of All The Best, George Bush: My Life in Letters and Other Writings, Scribners, New York, 1999, 9½" x 6¼", 640 pp. With original dust jacket. Signed on bookplate bearing the name "George Bush" and affixed to front pastedown. Very fine condition.
Estimated Value $150 - 200.
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Realized
$120
Lot 548
Bush, George H.W. Typed letter signed as President, one page, on The White House letterhead, 10½ x 7", Washington, July 2, 1992. To George James, Sr., V.P. and CFO of Levi Strauss & Company. In part: "I look forward to working with the 1992-1993 White House Fellows as of September 1, and I thank you for serving as a member of one of the Commission's regional panels during this year's selection process….The White House Fellowships have not only given to many talented, highly qualified young Americans the opportunity to learn, firsthand, about the Federal Government but also produced many dedicated public leaders. I am proud to count a number of former Fellows as members of the Administration…." Very fine.
Estimated Value $500 - 600.
Joseph L. Baldwin Collection.

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Realized
$810
Lot 549
Bush, George H.W. Typed letter signed ("George") as Chairman of the Republican National Committee, one page, on official letterhead, 9½ x 7", Washington, June 29, 1973. During the midst of the Watergate scandal, Bush congratulates a Minnesota Republican, F. Peavey Heffelfinger, on his appointment, hopes that his assistance helped, and expresses confidence that Mr. Heffelfinger will do a great job. Fine.
Estimated Value $150 - 200.
Joseph L. Baldwin Collection; purchased from Edward N. Bomsey, May 10, 1992.

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Lot 550
Carter, James E (1924 -) 39th President of the United States (1977-1981). Autograph note signed ("Jimmy Carter") as the Democratic presidential nominee, written on the first page of a printed interview with the National Education Association, outlining his positions on education, 4pp, 11 x 8½, n.p., n.d. (Sept. 1976 is written on the first page in another hand). Carter's note is written to Edith Green (1910-1987), who represented Oregon in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1955 to 1974, and who was known for advancing women's issues, education, and social reform. She played an instrumental role in passing the 1972 Equal Opportunity in Education Act, better known as Title IX. Carter writes: "To Hon. Edith Green / Here are some of my statements on education. I hope you will help me with advice, criticism and political support. Jimmy Carter." Fine.
Estimated Value $400 - 600.
Joseph L. Baldwin Collection; purchased from Robert A. Siegel auction, November 19, 1992.

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Lot 551
Carter, Jimmy. Autograph note signed on the lower right portion of a letter sent to Miss Lillian from Gary Lorenz of the Symphony School of America, La Crosse, Wisconsin, March 25, 1982, requesting her help in getting her son to write down his thoughts on his musical preferences. Success, for President Carter writes "My first were Grieg's piano concerto & all four of Rachmaninoff's (3rd my favorite). At the Naval Academy, my favorite music was Liebestod from Tristan. I like classical guitar & Recuerdos de la Alhambra is my favorite piece. Among operas, La Traviata was an early preference. Leontyne Price is my #1 operatic singer! These are just a very few of my favorites." Accompanied by a secretarially-signed letter to Mr. Lorenz dated April 21, 1982, and a note from Carter's assistant Faye Dill, dated June 8, 1982, apologizing for taking so long to get Mr. Carter's reply to him. A charming look into the musical taste of the former President. Fine condition.
Estimated Value $500 - 600.
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Lot 552
Carter, Jimmy. Typed letter signed ("Jimmy") as President, on pale green White House stationery, one page, 9" x 7", Washington, May 17, 1979. To Congressman Paul Simon, thanking him for his courageous vote on gas rationing, "I know that it was a difficult decision, but your action showed vision and recognition of a truly national concern. I look forward to continuing to work together toward the solution of our energy problems and the realization of other mutual goals." Fine condition.
Estimated Value $400 - 600.
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Realized
$660
Lot 553
Carter, Jimmy. Three signed items, all matted and framed together: 1) Photo signed ("J. Carter"), 9½" x 8", in the lower border, alongside a facsimile signature; 2) Souvenir Oath of Office signed ("J. Carter"), 5" x 4½", n.p., n.d. Signed lower left.; and 3) White House vignette signed ("Jimmy Carter"), black & white, 6" x 8". Boldly signed on the center lower light border. With a stamped and cancelled "James E. Carter" Inauguration Day Cover, Washington, January 20, 1977, and a red, white & blue bag of peanuts labeled "Inaugural Congratulations To The / ALL AMERICAN PRESIDENT / JIMMY CARTER / January 20, 1977." Overall size is 25" x 24". Fine.
Estimated Value $300 - 500.
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Realized
$172
Lot 554
Carter, Jimmy. A collection of five books authored and signed by the former President: 1) The Virtues of Aging, First Trade Paperback Edition 2) An Hour Before Daylight: Memories of a Rural Boyhood, First Edition, with original dust jacket. 3) Christmas In Plains: Memories, First Edition. With original dust jacket. 4) Sharing Good Times (two copies), First Edition. With original dust jacket. All five books and dust jackets are in very fine condition.
Estimated Value $250 - 300.
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Realized
$264
Lot 555
Carter, Jimmy. Five books signed, being five copies of Sources of Strength: Meditations On Scripture For A Living Faith, First Edition, Times Books/Random House, New York, 1997, 8½" x 5¾", 252 pp. With original dust jackets. Each book signed ("J. Carter") on the title page, in very fine condition.
Estimated Value $200 - 300.
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Realized
$120
Lot 556
Carter, Jimmy. Broadside signed as President, one page, 11 x 8½", Clinton, Mass., Mar. 16, 1977. Announcing a special town meeting, two months after becoming President, "…To see if the Town will vote to authorize the presentation of an appropriate memento of this honorable occasion, to the Board of Selectmen of the Town of Clinton…[and] To see if the Town will vote to suspend the rules, and refer this meeting to the pleasure of the President of the United States of America, Jimmy Carter". Very fine. When Carter first became President, he sought to be accessible to the people; the town meeting was one of the methods he used.
Estimated Value $200 - 250.
The Arden Family Holdings of Beverly Hills.

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Lot 557
Carter, Jimmy. Books signed. Four copies of Living Faith, First Edition, Times Books/Random House, New York, 1996, 8½" x 5¾", 256 pp. With original dust jackets. Each book signed ("J. Carter") on the first title page. All in very fine condition.
Estimated Value $150 - 200.
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Realized
$84
Lot 558
Carter, Jimmy. Two Books signed. 1) Our Endangered Values: America's Moral Crisis, First Edition, Simon & Schuster, New York, 2005, 9½" x 6½", 212 pp. 2) Palestine Peace Not Apartheid, First Edition, Simon & Schuster, New York, 2006, 9½" x 6½", 264 pp. Both with original dust jackets and both signed ("J. Carter") on the title page. Very fine.
Estimated Value $150 - 200.
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Realized
$84
Lot 559
Cleveland, Grover (1837-1908) 22nd and 24th President of the United States (1885-1889 and 1893-1897).

Photograph signed as President, two days before the end of his first term, 14½ x 11". Boldly signed and dated at the lower edge, "Grover Cleveland March 2, 1889." The sepia-toned, chest-up portrait is slightly faded but quite impressive. Matted and framed to an overall size of 24¾ x 21".

Previous to becoming President, Cleveland served as Mayor of Buffalo, N.Y. (1882) and Governor of New York (1883-85). He is the only President to have served two non-consecutive terms. Prior to the Twentieth Amendment, Inauguration Day was March 4, the day of the year on which the Constitution of the United States first took effect in 1789; the last inauguration to take place on March 4 was Franklin D. Roosevelt's first one on March 4, 1933. Since that time, the date changed to January 20.
Estimated Value $900 - 1,200.
The Arden Family Holdings of Beverly Hills.

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Lot 560
Cleveland, Grover. Partly-printed document signed as President, one page, 10 x 8", Washington, Nov. 1, 1888. Ordering the Secretary of State to "cause the Seal of the United States to be affixed to my Thanksgiving proclamation…." Boldly signed. Fine condition.
Estimated Value $400 - 600.
Joseph L. Baldwin Collection; purchased from Nancy L. McGlashan, November 6, 1992.

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Realized
$1,015
Lot 561
Cleveland, Grover and Cleveland Cabinet. Signatures signed as President. Dinner Guest Registry on paper 8¾" x 6¾", Washington, February 9, 1897. The President, First Lady and Cleveland's Cabinet members (and their wives), have signed: "Grover Cleveland" & "Frances F. Cleveland", "Adali Stevenson" (V.P.) & "Letitia Green Stevenson", "Richard Olney" (Sec. State) & "April P. Olney", "John G. Carlisle"("J.G.Carlisle") (Sec. Treasury) & "M.J. Carlisle", " Daniel S. Lamont" (Sec. War) & "Juliet K. Lamont", "Judson Harmon" (Atty. Gen.) & "Olive S. Harmon", "Hilary A. Herbert" ("H.A. Herbert") (Sec. Navy) & "Leila Herbert", "David R. Francis" (Sec. Int.) & "Jane P. Francis". Light toning and soiling do not effect the strong bold signatures. Matted with a picture of Cleveland and his Second Cabinet and framed to an overall size of 25¼" x 21¼". Fine condition.
Estimated Value $400 - 600.
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Realized
$357
Lot 562
Cleveland, Grover and Frances Cleveland. Two items: Executive Mansion card signed as President, 2¼"x 4", Washington, n.d. Matted with a large steel engraving and framed to an overall size of 30½" x 26½". Executive Mansion card signed as First Lady, 2½" x 4½", Washington, n.d. Matted with a hand-colored engraving of Mrs. Cleveland surrounded by embroidered flowers and framed to an overall size of 21" x 18". Both items fine.
Estimated Value $300 - 400.
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Realized
$283
Lot 563
[Clinton Impeachment] William Jefferson Clinton. Official red impeachment ticket, 5½ x 2½", Washington, Feb. 12, 1999. Imprinted "106th Congress - First Session, United States Senate, Impeachment Trial of the President of the United States, Admit Bearer to the Senate Press Gallery…" Signed by Henry Hyde, House Judiciary Committee Chairman, and California Representative James Rogan, who added, "1999, House Impeachment Manager." Rules of conduct are printed on the verso. Mint condition. February 12 was the day the Senate acquitted President Clinton on both articles of impeachment.

Accompanied by a color satin-finish 11 x 14" portrait of the thirteen House Managers in the impeachment trial, January-February 1999. Taken in the House Judiciary Committee hearing room shortly after the House of Representatives voted to approve the articles, which are visible on the table. Signed by all thirteen managers and accompanied by a letter from Congressman Rogan stating that he obtained all of the signatures personally. Mint. President Clinton was the first elected President to be impeached. (Andrew Johnson was not elected but succeeded to the Presidency on the assassination of Abraham Lincoln).
Estimated Value $500-UP.
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Realized
$2,160
Lot 564
Clinton, William J (1946 -) 42nd President of the United States (1993-2001). First day cover signed as Governor of Arkansas, postmarked Jan. 3, 1986. No. 76 of 150, celebrating Arkansas' Sesquicentennial. Pristine.
Estimated Value $300 - 500.
Joseph L. Baldwin Collection; purchased from Gary Hendershott, Aug. 23, 1993.

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Unsold
Lot 565
Clinton, William Jefferson. Typed letter signed ("Bill") as President, on pale green White House letterhead, one page, 9" x 6¾", Washington, November 22, 1994. To Susan Silver, personal friend and supporter of the President, thanking her: "I appreciate your encouragement and continued support of what we seek to do here, and I hope to see you soon." The President has added an Autograph note, in the bottom margin "We're swimming against a tide and with it ---The negatives outweighed the positives but it won't forever---." On November 9, 1994, in the General Election, the Democrats suffered a sweeping repudiation, with the Republicans picking up majorities or near majorities in both Houses. Very fine.
Estimated Value $800 - 1,200.
View details and enlarged photo
Realized
$1,080
Lot 566
Coolidge, Calvin (1872-1933) 30th President of the United States (1923-1929). Partly-printed document signed as President, one page, 14 x 18", Washington, Mar. 12, 1924. Appointing a Postmaster at Schoharie County, New York. Countersigned by Postmaster General Harry New. Embossed department seal at lower left. Evenly toned and slight wrinkling on the lower margin.
Estimated Value $250 - 350.
Joseph L. Baldwin Collection; purchased from Nancy L. McGlashan, November 6, 1992.

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Realized
$300
Lot 567
Coolidge, Calvin. The White House card signed as President, 2¾ x 4", Washington, n.d. Matted with a 12 x 8¼" image of Coolidge and framed to an overall size of 22½ x 16½". Light horizon crease across card under Washington, else fine.
Estimated Value $250 - 300.
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Realized
$295
Lot 568
Coolidge, Calvin. Sepia-toned photo inscribed and signed "To Dr. O.M. Lanstrum With Regards," 9" x 6", n.p., n.d. With embossed imprint of Harris & Ewing, Washington, D.C. Framed to an overall size of 14" x 10½". Excellent condition.
Estimated Value $250 - 350.
View details and enlarged photo
Realized
$234
Lot 569
Eisenhower, Dwight D (1890-1969) 34th President of the United States (1953-1961); Supreme Commander of Allied Forces in Europe during World War II. Typed letter signed ("Ike") as Allied Supreme Commander of NATO, one page, on "DDE" letterhead, Supreme Headquarters / Allied Powers Europe, Oct. 9, 1951. To Maj. Gen. and Mrs. Robert M. Littlejohn, sending thanks for 61st birthday greetings. "… I think if I could have my fondest wish today it would be that Mamie and I could be on our little farm in Gettsburg…." With a holograph postscript: "P.S. Happy birthday to John!" Fine. Gen. Littlejohn was the U. S. Army Quartermaster General during World War II. He received the Distinguished Service Medal and an Oak Leaf Cluster, the Legion of Merit and the Bronze Star.
Estimated Value $500 - 600.
Joseph L. Baldwin Collection; purchased from Charles Hamilton auction, May 31, 1984.

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Unsold
Lot 570
Eisenhower, Dwight D. Typed letter signed as President, on pale green White House letterhead, one page, 9" x 6¾", Washington, Jan. 28, 1957. To Miss Ethel Merman, American singer, actress and Broadway musical theather icon: "Although Mrs. Eisenhower and I were not able to attend the Inaugural Concert, we heard from many of our friends how enjoyable it was and how great was your contribution to the program. It almost seems traditional that you appear on any program with which our names are associated, and once again I want to express our appreciation of the contribution of your talent…" Minor toning from previous framing. Accompanied by two 10" x 8" black & white glossy photographs, one of Eisenhower as President and a publicity still of Miss Merman. Overall in fine condition.
Estimated Value $500 - 600.
View details and enlarged photo
Realized
$600
Lot 571
Eisenhower, Dwight D. Typed letter signed as President, on pale green White House letterhead, one page, 10½" x 7", Washington, May 24, 1960. To Chicago attorney and labor lawyer Harold M. Gilden, who was called upon three times between 1957 and 1961 by the President to serve on emergency panels to resolve national labor disputes. Here The President appoints Gilden to an Emergency Board to investigate a railroad dispute " …between the Chicago-Rock Island and Pacific Northwest Railroad Company and other carriers represented by the Western Carriers Conference Committee and certain of the employees represented by the Switchmen's Union of North America, AFL-CIO. I am pleased that you are willing to serve on this Emergency Board, and accordingly I hereby appoint you as a member of the Board. This letter will constitute your appointment and your authority to act as a member of the Board." Very fine.
Estimated Value $500 - 600.
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Unsold
Lot 572
Eisenhower, Dwight D. Typed letter signed as President, on pale green White House letterhead, one page, 8¾" x 6¾", Washington, May 31, 1960. To Robert R. Gros, Vice President, Pacific Gas and Electric, thanking him for his support after the Gary Powers U-2 incident and the disastrous May 1960 Cold War Paris Summit, "I am again indebted to you - - grateful to you for taking the trouble to write me regarding my Report to the Nation of last week and gratified beyond measure by the generosity of your praise of my effort during the amazing period I spent in Paris. I know that in your appearances before groups throughout the West, you will be, as always, and effective voice on the side of calmness and reason." Light toning and residue from a previous framing on verso, else fine.

On May 1, 1960, the Soviets shot down a CIA spy plane and captured the pilot, Gary Francis Powers, who admitted that he was working for the CIA. The Paris Summit, which had been previously planned with hopes of easing tensions between the super powers, began on May 16 but was doomed from the outset by the U-2 incident. Khrushchev condemned the "inadmissible, provocative actions" of the U.S., and when Eisenhower agreed to suspend the spy flights but not to punish those responsible, Khrushchev stormed out of the meeting. Eisenhower's planned trip to Moscow in June was cancelled.
Estimated Value $500 - 600.
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Realized
$308
Lot 573
Eisenhower, Dwight D. Typed letter signed, one page, on personal letterhead, 10¼ x 7", Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, Aug. 14, 1964. To Sister Mary Linus of San Luis Rey Academy in California. In part, "…Because of my own keen interest in the youth of America it is both a privilege and a pleasure to learn of your efforts to inspire your students with an understanding and awareness of our American heritage. May they accept with gratitude the freedom and equality inherent in our national life and be challenged to fulfill these promises for all Americans of every race and creed. May they also endeavor to protect and preserve our way of life for the generations yet unborn…." An important statement on civil rights by Ike, the same year that the Civil Rights Act was signed. Show-through from glue remnants on verso, most of which could be matted out.
Estimated Value $500 - 600.
The Arden Family Holdings of Beverly Hills.

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Realized
$240
Lot 574
Eisenhower, Dwight D. Photo inscribed and signed as President, "For Robert B. Anderson / With best wishes from Dwight D. Eisenhower," 14" x 11", n.p., c. 1952. With gold embossed imprint of Fabian Bachrach. Matted and framed to an overall size of 21½" x 16½".Anderson was Secretary of the Navy and later served as Secretary of the Treasury under Eisenhower. He was considered one of the President's closest confidants. A very handsome three-quarter length portrait of the President in fine condition.
Estimated Value $400 - 600.
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Realized
$517
Lot 575
Eisenhower, Dwight D. Typed letter signed as President, on pale green White House letterhead, one page, 9 x 6¾", Washington, June 13, 1959. To F. Peavey Heffelfinger, who was a millionaire Minneapolis grain dealer and chairman of the Republican Finance Committee: "I am grateful to you and Elizabeth for your note about Foster Dulles. I, too, felt a deep gratification at the outpouring of affection and admiration for this truly great man…." Elizabeth Heffelfinger was the Republican National Committeewoman from Minnesota from 1948 to 1960 and the secretary of the party's 1960 national convention.

John Foster Dulles (1888-1959) was U.S. Secretary of State under Eisenhower from 1953 to 1959. He advocated an aggressive stance against communism throughout the world, to the point of brinkmanship. He often called "nationalism" by the name "communism" as an excuse to interfere in, and even overthrow, other governments. With his brother, Allen Dulles (1893-1969), as head of the CIA, the two controlled both overt and covert operations of U.S. foreign policy.
Estimated Value $400 - 600.
The Arden Family Holdings of Beverly Hills.

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Realized
$180
Lot 576
Eisenhower, Dwight D. Photograph signed, 10 x 8", n.p., n.d. With printed salutation "For: Richard Rendell." Stamped credit on verso, "J. Anthony Wills Houston, Texas, Reproduction by U.S. Army." Fine.
Estimated Value $300 - 500.
View details and enlarged photo
Realized
$240
Lot 577
Eisenhower, Dwight D. Typed Letter Signed, one page, 7¾ x 5¾", New York City, April 24, 1950, on Columbia University, Office of the President stationery, with original postmark transmittal envelope. To Mr. George C. Herb of Allentown, PA., thanking him for his thoughtfulness. Fine condition.
Estimated Value $250 - 350.
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Realized
$148
Lot 578
Eisenhower, Dwight D. Signature as Chief of Staff, U.S. Army, on paper with engraved "War Department" and title, and typed "This is my autograph," 2¼ x 4½", n.p., n.d. Light soiling. Matted with a 9½ x 7¾" color image of Eisenhower wearing his five stars. Overall size is 16¾ x 11¾". Ready for framing.
Estimated Value $150 - 200.
The Arden Family Holdings of Beverly Hills.

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Realized
$677
Lot 579
Fillmore, Millard (1800-1874) 13th President of the United States (1850-1853). Autograph letter signed, one page, 8 x 5", Buffalo, Jan. 8, 1870. To New York Governor Hoffman, marked "Private":

"Dear Sir, I have made it an invariable rule to recommend no man for office and do not mean in this case to depart from that rule; but I understand Edwin C. Smith of Lyons is a candidate for the office of Harbor master, and that he is well recommended, and worthy of the place; but I am not acquainted with him, but for the sake of some friends who take an interest in his success, I should feel greatly gratified if you could feel justified in appointing him. Respectfully yours / Millard Fillmore." Accompanied by an engraving by Alonso Chappel. Fine condition.
Estimated Value $600 - 800.
Joseph L. Baldwin Collection; purchased from Wm. R. Weiss, Jr. auction, December 11, 1989.

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Realized
$840
Lot 580
Ford, Gerald R (1913-2006) 38th President of the United States (1974-1977). First edition book inscribed and signed as ex-President on the first end page of Portrait of the Assassin, written by Ford and John R. Stiles, New York, Simon and Schuster, 1965. The inscription reads: "To Gary Zimet, the opportunity to serve on the Warren Commission was both sad because J.F.K. was a friend and a challenge because it was important to do a good job. In my opinion the Warren Commission conclusions were sound and so far not challenged. No significant new evidence has been found. Lee Harvey Oswald was the Culprit. Gerald R. Ford / 11/29 /80."

In November 1963, President Lyndon B. Johnson appointed House Minority Leader Gerald Ford to the Warren Commission, a special task force set up to investigate the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Ford was assigned the task of preparing a biography of JFK's alleged assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald. To this day, many people disagree with the Warren Commission's finding that Oswald acted alone. Dust jacket has minor edge wear; price clipped from flap; text is lightly toned, else fine.
Estimated Value $3,000 - 5,000.
View details and enlarged photo
Realized
$1,860
Lot 581
Ford, Gerald R. Typescript signed, one page, 7½ x 5¾", on heavy brown paper, headed "THE WHITE HOUSE" and dated 11/5/79, being a souvenir copy of President Ford's pardon of former President Nixon. Full text:

"NOW, THEREFORE, I, Gerald R. Ford, President of the United States, pursuant to the pardon power conferred upon me by Article II, Section 2, of the Constitution, have granted and by these presents do grant a full, free, and absolute pardon unto Richard Nixon for all offenses against the United States which he, Richard Nixon, has committed or may have committed or taken part in during the period from January 20, 1969 through August 9, 1974.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth day of September in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and seventy-four"

President Ford's decision to pardon Richard Nixon for his role in the Watergate debacle came under heavy criticism. Nixon had resigned because it seemed likely that he would not survive a full impeachment vote in the Congress. The pardon eliminated the possibility of a trial for Nixon. It also probably ended Ford's chances for re-election to the presidency in 1976.
Estimated Value $800 - 1,200.
Joseph L. Baldwin Collection; purchased from Stephen Koschal, April 18, 1981.

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Realized
$1,110
Lot 582
Ford, Gerald R. Typed letter signed ("Jerry Ford") as Minority Leader of the House of Representatives, 2pp, on official letterhead, Washington, Sept. 11, 1969. A long letter to a constituent in Michigan who is on disability, defending President Nixon and his policies. In part: "…President Nixon…is striving diligently to do the best for his country in solving a number of extremely complicated and difficult problems…meeting on Friday with all of his top advisors to discussed [sic] what must now be done in Vietnam in view of the attitude of the Communist enemy and in view of the death of Ho Chi Minh….The President also has to meet the problem of inflation…[He] is dedicated to a balanced budget….Mr. Nixon will continue to hold down expenses in an effort to protect the economic strength of our country. I can assure you, however, that the President is not 'taking graft.' He had a lucrative law practice before he became President and is in every respect an honorable man who does not have to accept 'graft' nor would he consider doing so…." Excellent content. Fine condition.
Estimated Value $400 - 600.
Joseph L. Baldwin Collection; purchased from Charles Hamilton auction, January 22, 1981.

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Realized
$418
Lot 583
Ford, Gerald R. Document signed, one page, headed GERALD R. FORD / THIRTY-EIGHTH PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA/ 1974-1977, 11 x 8½", n.p. n.d. Being a quote from Ford's speech after he took the oath of office: "I assume the Presidency under extraordinary circumstances…. This is an hour of history that troubles our minds and hurts our hearts. Gerald R. Ford / August 9, 1974." Accompanied by a 4¼ x 5½" card signed with a print of the Gerald R. Ford Museum in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Both items are signed with blue marker. Excellent condition. Ford was the first Vice President chosen under the terms of the Twenty-fifth Amendment and, in the aftermath of the Watergate scandal, succeeded the first President (Richard Nixon) ever to resign.
Estimated Value $400 - 600.
The Arden Family Holdings of Beverly Hills.

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Realized
$215
Lot 584
Ford, Gerald R. Typed letter signed as President, on White House letterhead, one page, 8¾ x 6¾", Washington, Aug. 31, 1974. To entertainer Pearl Buck, just three weeks after being thrust into the presidency with Richard Nixon's resignation. In part: "…Thank you…for your wonderful telegrams expressing support following my swearing in as President. I did not seek either office as you know. But with God's help and the faith and confidence of good friends such as you throughout the country I will do my very best to fulfill the obligations of the office…." Very fine. An excellent letter.
Estimated Value $400 - 600.
The Arden Family Holdings of Beverly Hills.

View details and enlarged photo
Realized
$720



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