Goldberg Coins and Collectibles



Sale 81

The Pre-Long Beach Sale


$20 St. Gaudens
 
 
Lot Photo Description Realized
Lot 1354
1907. Flat relief, Arabic numerals. PCGS graded MS-62. Housed in an Old Green Holder (PCGS # 9141) .
Estimated Value $1,250 - 1,300.
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Realized
$1,539
Lot 1355
1908. No motto. PCGS graded MS-64. Frosty with a hint of light tone and very choice. Two-year type before Congress ordered the Mint to reinstitute the national motto IN GOD WE TRUST (PCGS # 9142) .
Estimated Value $1,300 - 1,350.
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Realized
$1,498
Lot 1356
1908. No motto. NGC graded MS-62. Frosty and untoned. Interesting two-year Type without IN GOD WE TRUST (PCGS # 9142) .
Estimated Value $1,150 - 1,200.
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Realized
$1,288
Lot 1357
1908. No motto. NGC graded MS-62. Frosty and untoned (PCGS # 9142) .
Estimated Value $1,150 - 1,200.
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$1,288
Lot 1358
1908. No motto. NGC graded MS-61. Untoned (PCGS # 9142) .
Estimated Value $1,150 - 1,200.
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Realized
$1,262
Lot 1359
1908-S. With Motto. PCGS graded MS-61. Only 22,000 minted. Lustrous with some mottled areas of rose color toning. Popular as the lowest mintage regular issue $20 in the series. Slightly flat on Liberty's face, with normal scattered bagmarks. A nice reddish gold luster emits subtle radiance from this coin. Reasonable detail with perhaps minor weakness to the knee and eagle's neck feathers, though elsewhere firmly struck by the dies. This is a desirable San Francisco Mint rarity. Few coined; many did reach circulation, which accounts for a strictly limited Mint State census (PCGS # 9149) .
Estimated Value $9,000 - 10,000.
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Lot 1360
1909, 9 over 8. NGC graded AU-58. Clear underfigure "8" below the second 9 on this popular, and relatively low mintage issue. Much of the original luster is still intact.
Estimated Value $1,500 - 1,600.
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Realized
$1,704
Lot 1361
1909, 9 over 8. NGC graded AU-55. Lightly toned. Desirable as the only 20th century overdated U.S. gold coin.
Estimated Value $1,500 - 1,600.
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Lot 1362
1910-D. NGC graded MS-64. CAC Approved. Nice golden toning. The color is a rich shade of coppery gold. Pure-gold coins, as in our modern .9999 Fine bullion pieces, are yellow gold. However, the hardened circulation coins of yesteryear required an alloy of copper (usually 10%) to strengthen them for use in commerce, otherwise the would abrade rapidly. It is this copper alloy that lends its tint to the golden luster (PCGS # 9155) .
Estimated Value $1,400 - 1,450.
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Realized
$1,704
Lot 1363
1910-S. PCGS graded MS-65. A beauty exhibiting delicate golden sunset toning. Intense but still satiny frost, the coin lightly toned to a soft golden color through which brighter gold radiance persists almost undiminished. The devices were struck with such determined force by the dies that all design elements show boldly, a classic '10-S Saint-Gaudens Double Eagle and primed for a high-end collection. Pop 188; 9 finer, 5 in 66, 2 in 66+, 1 in 67, 1 in 68 (PCGS # 9156) .
Estimated Value $6,500 - 7,000.
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Realized
$7,931
Lot 1364
1911-S. NGC graded MS-63. Bright and lustrous. The surface choicer than average, though we note a few light marks in the field and on Liberty's body (PCGS # 9159) .
Estimated Value $1,200 - 1,250.
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Realized
$1,288
Lot 1365
1911-S XF-40. Nice even wear.
Estimated Value $1,100 - 1,150.
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Realized
$1,236
Lot 1366
1912. PCGS graded MS-63. Reddish sunset toning. In this period occurs a string of low mintage Philadelphia dates. The bulk of production seems to have gone to the branch Mints, although in 1912, only Philadelphia struck the denomination. Mintage: 149,750 (PCGS # 9160) .
Estimated Value $1,600 - 1,650.
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Realized
$1,939
Lot 1367
1913. PCGS graded MS-62. Lightly toned. Scarcer Philadelphia Mint issue in terms of its low mintage, 168,780 pieces. A lustrous coin (PCGS # 9161) .
Estimated Value $1,500 - 1,550.
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Realized
$1,763
Lot 1368
1914. NGC graded MS-61. Lightly toned. Only 95,320 struck. Affordable low-mintage year (PCGS # 9164) .
Estimated Value $1,300 - 1,350.
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Realized
$1,498
Lot 1369
1914-S. NGC graded MS-63. Mostly untoned. Minor reverse streak. A well struck, frosty coin (PCGS # 9166) .
Estimated Value $1,200 - 1,250.
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$1,288
Lot 1370
1915. NGC graded Proof 66. A marvelous pale golden Matte Proof example of the last year of issue. Needle sharp and untoned. Only 50 Matte Proofs minted. Technically, this Proof Saint-Gaudens Double Eagle is a sandblast piece, but common usage calls these "Matte Proofs." And a Gem Proof nevertheless, with strong fundamental supporting surfaces free of marks, devoid of spots, tops in its class, and for that matter, mesmerizing to gaze upon. Nicely struck, though not that it matters our saying so since all 1915 Proofs were made with care. They were struck at the Philadelphia Mint on the mint's hydraulic medal press to insure even flow into the die recesses, and a bold relief. The medal press gave the dies a particularly nice "squeeze", which imparted the design superbly. America's sandblast Proofs resulted from some experimentation in 1907 at the mint after it was discovered the earlier mirror-finish with frosted relief quality was impossible to achieve on the new Saint-Gaudens pieces. Owing to the peculiarity of the design, the entire planchet is struck in such a way that the whole surface of the coin loses the brilliant, polished finish so much valued by collectors. The net result was that the coins left the dies with a bright or satiny appearance.

The officials at the Mint decided that since they could not make mirrored Proofs, and wanted something distinctive for collectors, they would sandblast the finished coins in 1908 and 1911-15 (and a few 1907 samples). One reason the sandblast surface was considered too radical is that it would prevent the Mint from putting any rejects into circulation. The few remaining sandblast or Matte Proofs of 1915 are the crème de la crème of numismatics today, with this resplendent Proof 66 example a sterling (or perhaps that should be "golden") jewel for some collector. Pop 9; 1 finer in 67 (PCGS # 9212) .

The U.S. Mint under wartime conditions: When war broke out in Europe in the summer of 1914, the US government quickly closed the New York Stock Exchange and ceased trading gold for fear there would be a run on the Treasurys stock of coins and gold bars. The 12 Federal Reserve district banks had not yet been opened, and there was also a threat that their stock of gold coins for backing Federal Reserve currency and deposits would be jeopardized. The stock market would remain closed until December. However, contrary to expectations, no panic run on the nations gold supply occurred and instead we experienced a bonanza when gold money began flowing into New York from the belligerents in the autumn that year. The warring factions needed to pay for supplies, and they wanted to secure a safe repository during the conflict. Europe had gone off the gold standard in August 1914, when war was declared, but the United States, alone among the major powers, was able to continue issuing gold and conducting gold market operations throughout the conflict. The mints did, however, cease striking Proof gold coins after this 1915 Matte Proof issue, and a final run of Half Eagles, Eagles, and Double Eagles was made in 1916 at the San Francisco Mint before gold coinage ceased. U.S. Double Eagle coinage did not resume until 1920.
Estimated Value $100,000 - 110,000.
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Lot 1371
1915. NGC graded MS-62. Lightly toned and alive with frosted luster. The 1915-P issue tends to come with broad square rims, unlike its 1915 San Francisco Mint counterpart (PCGS # 9167) .
Estimated Value $1,400 - 1,500.
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Realized
$1,674
Lot 1372
1916-S. PCGS graded MS-63. Bright and lustrous. Reddish to warm-gold satin frost is boldly hypnotic on this fresh-appearing $20 and choice in its preservation. Since our observation is that this date is almost always fully struck, then this sharp coin has every suggestion of precision manufacture as seen in main devices (PCGS # 9169) .
Estimated Value $1,350 - 1,400.
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Realized
$1,586
Lot 1373
1920. PCGS graded MS-63. Delicate golden-olive toning. While most dates in the 1920s are very common, the 1920-P is relatively scarce in grades from MS63 and higher. Choice, lustrous, attractive appearing (PCGS # 9170) .
Estimated Value $1,600 - 1,650.
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$1,586
Lot 1374
1922. NGC graded MS-62. Very frosty. Many double eagles were kept in Treasury vaults as backing for Gold Certificates in the 1920s, since people found their use inconvenient compared to the easy to handle paper notes. As long as confidence remained that the notes could be exchanged "on demand" for the specie (coins), prices were stable (PCGS # 9173) .
Estimated Value $1,150 - 1,200.
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Realized
$1,288
Lot 1375
1923. PCGS graded MS-64 PQ. Frosty and lightly toned (PCGS # 9175) .
Estimated Value $1,500 - 1,550.
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Realized
$1,528
Lot 1376
1923-D. PCGS graded MS-64. Intensely lustrous. Always swimming in satin-like luster, this date is popular with Type collectors as an affordable 1920s decade Double Eagle struck at a branch mint. Most others are expensive to very expensive (PCGS # 9176) .
Estimated Value $1,550 - 1,600.
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Realized
$1,528
Lot 1377
  Withdrawn
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Lot 1378
  Withdrawn
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Lot 1379
1924. NGC graded MS-63+. Frosty and untoned, a choice example (PCGS # 9177) .
Estimated Value $1,250 - 1,300.
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Realized
$1,257
Lot 1380
1924 PCGS graded Genuine Unc Details. Altered surfaces. A frosty example with strong eye appeal. The grading service was quite tough on this one (PCGS # 9177) .
Estimated Value $1,200 - 1,250.
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Realized
$1,185
Lot 1381
1924 PCGS graded Genuine Unc Details. Altered surfaces. A pleasing example. Subtle golden coloration graces both sides (PCGS # 9177) .
Estimated Value $1,200 - 1,250.
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Realized
$1,185
Lot 1382
1926. PCGS graded MS-66. A glittering gem with intensely vivid mint bloom colors. A bold striking with vibrant, satiny-textured surfaces that display only the faintest signs of mellowing in the fields. The 26-P Saint is readily available in Mint State, but at this almost unimprovable MS66 grade level very few exist and prospective bidders always turn up in droves. Pop 767; 11 finer, 7 in 66+, 4 in 67 (PCGS # 9183) .
Estimated Value $2,200 - 2,400.
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Realized
$3,173
Lot 1383
1926. PCGS graded MS-62. A nice untoned coin (PCGS # 9183) .
Estimated Value $1,200 - 1,250.
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$1,288
Lot 1384
  Withdrawn
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Lot 1385
  Withdrawn
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Lot 1386
  Withdrawn
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Lot 1387
  Withdrawn
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Lot 1388
1927-S. NGC graded MS-63. A popular key date. Attractive light golden toning. As is the case with virtually every other branch mint date in the post-1922 Saint-Gaudens series, the 1927-S always had considerable prestige and has earned a place of honor despite its 3.1 million mintage. There is nothing unusual about three million Double Eagles being struck at San Francisco mint in this year, for the 1920s were a period of rollicking boom-time conditions such that it became known as The Roaring Twenties here in the U.S. (The reason for the coin's rarity is that almost the entire mintage was melted in the 1930s, but that story is for another day.) In the 1940s, the 1927-S was considered by collectors to be one of the Big Four in terms of rarity.

Since then, a few auction appearances of low-end Mint State grade 1927-S double eagles occur, yet this continues as one of the most widely appreciated S-mint rarities of the period. Turnover of "estate" and "name" sales was barely sufficient to supply an increasing collector, and later, sophisticated investor, demand. Most of these coins that are left to us are low-end. They are generally bagmarked MS60 specimens. Choice and better quality examples turn out to be incredibly rare. There was a time when the 1927-S was thought to be even rarer than the legendary 1927-D. Then came the 1950s, and that perception switched places when a few 27-S example turned up in European bank hoards. But like the 1926-D, the 1927-S never occurs in any quantity. Very few are auctioned today in all grades. We consider it an occasion when we have one to offer. The smart, sparkling coppery gold luster flares into heavy frostiness in a few areas with magnificent smooth flow into all the crevices and even across the more exposed areas such as the fields. Turning to the other key dynamic, we describe a coin that is desirable with this meticulous strike on the figure and face of Liberty. The sun rays and the small Capitol dome by her side show full detail. The eagle, for its part, continues with sharp relief (notice the clear breast feathers) whereby the wings, flight feathers, and all of the breast impression shows. Finally, there are almost no grade-activating marks to draw your critical attention to. All in all a landmark offering of this important rarity. Pop 14; 28 finer at NGC. (PCGS # 9188) .
Estimated Value $40,000 - 43,000.
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Lot 1389
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Lot 1390
1926. ANACS graded MS-62. Select surfaces, sharp detail. Struck at the pinnacle of the Roaring Twenties when businiess conditions were booming.
Estimated Value $1,150 - 1,200.
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Realized
$1,410
Lot 1391
  A pair of ANACS slabbed double eagles. Consists of: 1908 No Motto, MS-60 Details, Cleaned; 1911-D, MS-60 Details, Cleaned. Lot of 2 coins.
Estimated Value $2,200 - 2,300.
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Realized
$2,526
Lot 1392
  A trio of ANACS slabed double eagles. Consists of: 1904, MS-60 Details, Polished (1); 1924, MS-60 Details, Cleaned (2). Lot of 3 coins.
Estimated Value $3,300 - 3,400.
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Realized
$3,731






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