Goldberg Coins and Collectibles



Sale 74

June Long Beach Coin Auction


Seated Liberty Half Dollars
 
 
Lot Photo Description Realized
Lot 2823
1839. No Drapery. NGC graded MS-67. Well struck with light medium blue toning. Pop 1; none finer at NGC. The Finest graded.

A coin that a few years ago sold in a Heritage sale in Florida and by far the most impressive 1839 No Drapery Half Dollar of them all!

According to the earlier explanatory notes in that sale, "The first-year 1839 No Drapery half dollar is a popular issue accordingly, one eagerly pursued by type and complete set collectors equally. Even AU55 and lower-Mint State specimens are hotly contested at auctions, but the Superb Gem grade of the present piece elevates it to the status of a legendary rarity. This coin is the single finest certified at NGC by two grade points, and at the MS65 level, NGC has only graded a mere two coins. The situation is exactly the same at PCGS, which shows two MS65 specimens as the finest.

"By the time the 1839 half dollar coins had been issued, the new Seated Liberty design of Christian Gobrecht was already four years old, and the concept was older still. There was much ado at the Mint in the 1830s. Samuel Moore's service as Mint director ended in 1835, and Robert Maskell Patterson, son of former Mint Director Robert Patterson, took up the reins. The Thonnelier steam press enabled more coins, and more-uniform coins, to be produced, and was employed beginning in 1836 on the Reeded Edge half dollars.

"Patterson fils favored the seated figure of Britannia on coins of Great Britain to the dated Liberty bust on U.S. coinage, and he charged Mint Engraver William Kneass with developing a similar design for the silver dollar, then America's most important and prestigious coin. Kneass produced a sketch before suffering a debilitating stroke in August 1835. Naturalist Thomas Sully and portraitist Titian Peale advanced the designs on obverse and reverse, respectively, before Gobrecht, now second engraver (but functionally chief engraver), got the chance to model it into coinage dies.

"The design premiered on the 1836-dated Gobrecht silver dollars and was reused on 1838- and 1839-dated dollars. Unfortunately, when the Seated Liberty design was introduced on minor coinage, the marvelous Flying Eagle reverse design was gone. Beginning in 1837 with the silver half dimes and dimes, in 1838 with the quarters, and in 1839 with the half dollars, the two smaller denominations would feature a pedestrian wreath on the reverse, while the larger ones would sport an archaic eagle, transfixed by a metal shield pinned to his breast (perhaps a remembrance of "Old Pete," the Mint's eagle mascot, whose untimely demise was caused by a metal flywheel that began spinning with no warning).

"First and second transitional pattern 1838 No Drapery proof halves (Judd-82 and 83) are known, both extremely rare to unique. The 1839 No Drapery halves were produced to the extent of 1.97 million business, along with about four known proofs. Mint State examples of the 1839 No Drapery are of the highest rarity, with less than four dozen certified in all Mint State grades between NGC and PCGS combined. Although one reverse die is known to have been used for the few proofs and some business strikes, the extensive cracking characteristic of that reverse is absent on this coin.

The present coin offers an abundance of remarkable features. First, of course, is its awe-inspiring aesthetic appeal. Time and Nature working together in their patient way, have allowed the obverse and reverse to acquire matched lovely patina in shades of lilac and blue at the centers, lightening to pale pinkish at the rims. The strike is typical of early Seated coinage in being uneven is a few areas, but is extremely bold nonetheless, all things considered. We note classic detailing on Liberty's head and hair tresses, drapery, and shield. Turning to the reverse, the eagle repeats the process. Only a couple of peripheral stars on the obverse are incomplete. Both sides avoided post-striking human handling marks. A tiny planchet flaw appears as a depression in the reverse field above HA of HALF. All in all, a resplendent and appealing example of this Type, which happens to be a one-year Type, and the single finest known of this historic 1839 first-year type.
Estimated Value $100,000 - 110,000.
From The Joseph C. Thomas Collection, Part Two.

View details and enlarged photos
Realized
$138,000
Lot 2824
  1861-O 50¢ S.S. Republic Shipwreck Coins. A Lot of 10-Pieces, each NGC graded AU and Unc Shipwreck Effect, Confederate States Issue. Each housed in a special deluxe wooden box with descriptive booklet by Odyssey Marine Exploration with a COA. Lot of 10 coins.
Estimated Value $2,500 - 3,000.
The Arden Collection.

View details
Realized
$5,060
Lot 2825
1861-O Liberty Seated Half Dollar. Lot of two sets each in a special NGC Limited Edition. 43 of 50 and 20 of 50. WB102, WB103. Each in a custom wooden case with descriptive booklet issued by Odyssey Marine Exploration, Inc. Our grades are Shipwreck Effect EF and AU. 2 coins in each box. Lot of 4 coins.
Estimated Value $800 - 1,000.
The Arden Collection.

View details and enlarged photos
Realized
$1,553
Lot 2826
1862 Liberty Seated Half Dollar. NGC graded Proof 66. Well struck with natural mottled multi-color toning on both sides. Only 550 Proofs minted. The relative unavailability of gem quality business strike 1862 Seated Half Dollars (253,000 pieces produced) has given a boost to interest in the top-notch Proofs. Likewise, survivors from the 550-coin Proof delivery have enjoyed constant demand even as market moods have fluctuated between the various collecting areas such as Type versus Rare Dates or Die Varieties. At the PR66 level of preservation, however, there can be no debate about the rarity, desirability, or importance of the 1862 Half Dollar. Fully brought up throughout. Pop 8; 3 finer, 1 in 66 Star, 2 in 67.
Estimated Value $5,000 - 5,500.
The Arden Collection.

View details and enlarged photos
Realized
$6,900
Lot 2827
1864 Liberty Seated Half Dollar. NGC graded Proof 62. Lightly toned. Only 470 Proofs minted.
Estimated Value $800 - 900.
The Arden Collection.

View details and enlarged photos
Realized
$891
Lot 2828
1866 Liberty Seated Half Dollar. With motto. PCGS graded Proof 67 Cameo. This is an exquisite first-year specimen that makes even the most seasoned numismatist take notice, a one-of-a-kind beauty. Lovely electric blue and lavender toning. Only 725 Proofs minted. The fully brought up devices, reflective fields, and knife-like rims all confirm this coin's status as a superb Proof. The 67 grade is also accurate in that both sides are free of even the most trivial blemish or distraction. That having been said, the eye appeal benefits further from the presence of the most remarkable iridescent patina that appears to radiate a hypnotizing alien force from its mirror perfection. Lastly, the devices display cameo contrast against this although surely lost on first glance because of the colors vibrancy. This is the only PR67 example known to PCGS, and it is hard to imagine one surpassing it. One of the finest Proof representatives of a date that is scarce to rare at all levels of Mint State preservation. Pop 1; none finer at PCGS. The Finest graded (PCGS # 86424) .

One of the sections of the law authorizing the switch to bronze in the Indian cent in 1864 permitted the Treasury to order the addition of the motto "In God We Trust" to any coin it thought proper. The beginning of the war had prompted a great rise in religious feelings; an earlier suggestion in 1861 of adding the motto had found a receptive home in the Lincoln administration, especially with Secretary Chase. Several pattern silver and gold coins had been struck during the war to illustrate the concept. The half dollar denomination received the new motto only in 1866 and it appears thereon on every issue to the present.
Estimated Value $30,000 - 35,000.
View details and enlarged photos
Check results on similar lots
Realized
$26,450
Lot 2829
1874 Liberty Seated Half Dollar. Arrows. PCGS graded MS-63. Nice even grey toning. A lustrous, well struck example of the important Arrows type, whose use allowed the Mint to differentiate between the earlier, pre Act of 1873 coins. Though at the time, because the weight difference was so little, there was scarcely any reason for withdrawing earlier coins from circulation, and so none were withdrawn. Pop 41; 89 finer (PCGS # 6346) .
Estimated Value $1,200 - 1,300.
View details and enlarged photos
Check results on similar lots
Realized
$1,610
Lot 2830
1876-CC Liberty Seated Half Dollar. NGC graded MS-65. A wonderful frosty white example with semi-reflective surfaces on both sides. A glossy coin and a gem by any benchmark. What's more, this has an engaging display of brilliance that soars across the highly lustrous silvery surfaces of this scarce Carson City branch mint gem. The strike is strong for the date, including all stars.
Estimated Value $3,000 - 3,200.
View details and enlarged photos
Realized
$4,600
Lot 2831
1880 Liberty Seated Half Dollar. NGC graded Proof 62. Lightly toned. Only 1,355 Proofs made for this low mintage date. Delicate colors; some fine hairlines present accounting for the modest grade on what is an otherwise razor-sharp Proof.
Estimated Value $600 - 650.
The Arden Collection.

View details and enlarged photos
Realized
$920
Lot 2832
1885 Liberty Seated Half Dollar. NGC graded Proof 62. Nicely toned, some hairlines hidden underneath but still select quality on this scarce date from the 1880s. Only 930 Proofs struck.
Estimated Value $600 - 650.
View details and enlarged photos
Realized
$920






Home | Current Sale | Calendar of Events | Bidding | Consign | About Us | Contact | Archives | Log In

US Coins & Currency | World & Ancient Coins | Manuscripts & Collectibles | Bonded CA Auctioneers No. 3S9543300
11400 W. Olympic Blvd, Suite 800, Los Angeles CA 90064 | 310. 551.2646 ph | 310.551.2626 fx | 800.978.2646 toll free

© 2011 Ira & Larry Goldberg Coins & Collectibles, All Rights Reserved
info@goldbergcoins.com