Goldberg Coins and Collectibles



Sale 67

The Pre-Long Beach Auction


Patterns
 
 
Lot Photo Description Realized
Lot 1041
1852 Pattern Gold Dollar. Silver, plain edge, thin planchet. Judd-138. Pollock-165. Rarity Low 7. NGC graded Proof 65 CAC Approved. Lightly toned with natural patination, the simple design on this trial piece shows clear detail in the lettering and date. In 1852, the Mint experimented with increasing the size of the Gold Dollar without increasing the amount of gold in each coin. Two methods were considered - adding more metal (copper or silver) to the alloy or increasing the diameter of the coin and perforating the center. The first method was never tried because it was known that adding silver would turn the alloy white and adding copper would turn the alloy red. Thus, the second method was tried, first by perforating previously struck coins, then by creating new dies specifically designed to produce perforated or "annulated" coins. Judd 138 may have been one of the earliest types produced in silver. Oddly, one of the two known Judd-137 examples struck in gold is claimed to have been struck over an 1846 Quarter Eagle. It is believed that some of the issue was struck in 1859 or later, as the underlying coin of another Judd-137, is an 1859 Quarter Eagle. The question arises, Could the silver Judd-138s have also been minted as late as 1859? Pop 6; 1 in PF-66.
Estimated Value $4,000 - 4,500.
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Realized
$6,038
Lot 1042
1852 Pattern Gold Dollar. Bronze, plain edge. Judd-148b. Rarity 8. PCGS graded Proof 63 CAC Approved. Extremely rare. Lustrous with natural color. Pop 2; none finer. Only 2 coins graded at PCGS for this Judd number (PCGS # 11618) .

During this period the silver coins were disappearing from circulation due to the fact that they contained more bullion than their face value. Hence there was a demand for gold coins of the dollar and half-dollar denomination. Mr. Walter Breen found in the Archives a letter from the Director of the Mint, George N. Eckert, to Senator R. M. T. Hunter dated January 27, 1852, which shows that the half-dollar and larger ring-gold dollar were the first pieces made. He says,

"In reply to your letter of the 17th, I herewith enclose planchets of perforated or annulated dollars and half dollars in gold, with such rude design as was possible without the construction of new dies. The planchets are rather larger, & the perforation consequently wider, than I think desirable for the piece, but we were limited by the time and means at our disposal, and have struck them with Dime and half dime dies.

"Respecting the practicability of such a coinage, I find some difference of opinion among those familiar with the mechanical processes of the Mint. None doubt that it can be executed; the only doubt is as to the comparative rapidity with which it can be done. If Congress should approve such perforated coins, it appears to me that any law authorizing the issue should not be absolutely obligatory, but defer the matter to the ultimate decision of the President, which could be safely given after practical trials, and a report from the Mint.

"I think any attempt to increase the size of the gold dollar by alloying it is quite impracticable. A very small addition of silver would make, to all appearances, a silver coin, so that counterfeiting would be readily accomplished. Copper would create a copper color, and be so much worse than silver.

"In short, if the present gold dollar is unacceptable, the perforated coin appears the only feasible substitute. Better than all, however, is such an alteration in our laws as would restore silver to the circulation, & render such small gold pieces altogether unnecessary.''.
Estimated Value $8,000 - 10,000.
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Realized
$7,475
Lot 1043
1855 Pattern Cent. Copper, plain edge. Original. Judd-167. Pollock-193. Rarity 5. PCGS graded Proof 40, Original. CAC approved. Pop 2; 21 finer (PCGS # 11709) .
Estimated Value $1,200 - 1,300.
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Realized
$1,495
Lot 1044
1859 Pattern Cent Copper-Nickel Plain Edge Judd-228 Pollock-272 Rarity 1. PCGS graded MS-64. A brilliant example with a streak of toning on the reverse. This is one of the popular Transitional issues in the Pattern series, incorporating the new Indian cent obverse with the soon-to-be-adopted oak wreath reverse of 1860. Always desirable and readily affordable unlike many scarcer Patterns which can be prohibitively expensive. Pop 122; 72 finer (PCGS # 11932) .
Estimated Value $1,000 - 1,250.
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Realized
$949
Lot 1045
1863 Pattern Quarter Dollar. Copper, reeded edge. Judd-336. Pollock-408. NGC graded Proof 66 Red & Brown. Low Rarity 7. Wonderful bluish iridescent toning. This is an example in copper of the eventual With Motto reverse. Modern theory has it these were struck after the fact, after the date on the coin. A regular Proof obverse of 1863 is mated to the IN GOD WE TRUST reverse adopted in 1866-91 on the seated Liberty Quarters. Rare in all grades, but particularly enviable in this outstanding Proof 66 condition. The toning is breath-taking. Pop 1; none finer.
Estimated Value $4,000 - 5,000.
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Realized
$6,038
Lot 1046
1864 Pattern Dollar. Aluminum, reeded edge. Judd-398. Pollock-466. High Rarity 7. NGC graded Proof 66. Exquisite and problem-free. A once-in-a-lifetime example of this rare Pattern issue, with abundant luster that shimmers over pristine surfaces. We have mentioned the luster, though we wish we could expand upon it into several paragraphs. In winding up this description, we point to it being a strongly struck coin, with keen-edged detail to all the important high points.

Struck in aluminum. Aluminum was the new "wonder metal" of the mid-1800s when this coin was made. Light and easy to work, it had splendid properties and possibilities. There was only one disadvantage: price. Although the price of aluminum fell to below that of silver by the early 1860s, it was still expensive to produce, hovering around twelve dollars a pound between 1862 and 1886. It retained this status until metallurgists found a way to smelt it in quantity. As a consequence, the US. mint struck very limited numbers of aluminum Patterns and die trial pieces each year, often Rarity-6 or Rarity-7 items. (In 1889, man's technology finally caught up with his need for large quantities of this miracle light metal; prices plummeted and aluminum was soon being used to make tokens, medals, promotional badges, inflation coins by the jillion, and all sorts of other flimsy doodads.) Pop 1; the only one graded (PCGS # 60569) .
Estimated Value $12,000 - 14,000.
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Realized
$14,950
Lot 1047
1865 Pattern Three Dollars. Copper, reeded edge. Judd-441. Pollock-516. NGC graded Proof 66 Brown. An extremely rare Pattern struck by the regular Proof dies used to make gold $3 coins, this copper-planchet specimen has loads of character to it. Besides its Proof 66 grade, certifying the extraordinary condition after so many years, it has taken on wonderful toning atop the mirror surface. Spot-free, it stands above the rest of the few known examples as Finest Graded, Finest Known, with a first-class provenance to match. Low Rarity 7. Pop 1; none finer (PCGS # 60626) .
Estimated Value $5,000 - 6,000.
Ex Lemus Collection.

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Realized
$10,638
Lot 1048
1866 Pattern Five Cents. Copper, plain edge. Judd-498. Pollock-584. High Rarity 7. PCGS graded Proof 64 Red & Brown. A nice bold strike and Very Rare. An early adaptation of Longacre's shield device for the Five-cent piece, this has the shield set low in the field, with the ball dividing the date 18 66. Razor-sharp detail. Pop 1; 1 in 65 RB (PCGS # 70694) .
Estimated Value $5,000 - 6,000.
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Realized
$5,865
Lot 1049
1869 Pattern Five Cents Nickel Plain Edge Judd-684 Pollock-763 Rarity 5. NGC graded Proof 64 Cameo. Brilliant and untoned, a glistening Proof which displays Longacre's familiar coronet-adorned head of Liberty. A similar profile appears on Longacre's Indian cent, Three-cent nickel, gold dollar, and three-dollar gold piece. (He must have been fond of this rendition of Liberty!). Pop 2; 4 finer in 65CAM.
Estimated Value $1,600 - 1,800.
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Realized
$1,610
Lot 1050
1870 Pattern Half Dime. Silver, reeded edge. Judd-815. Pollock-904. Low Rarity 7. NGC graded Proof 66 CAC Approved. Lovely uniform turquoise iridescent toning on both sides. Combines Barbers petite seated figure of Liberty (facing left, on the regular coinage, Longacres faces right). The regular Longacre cereal wreath reverse as used since 1860 is paired to this Barber obverse on Judd-815. Pop 2; none finer (PCGS # 61059) .
Estimated Value $4,000 - 4,500.
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Realized
$4,140
Lot 1051
1870 Pattern Dime. Silver, plain edge. Judd-832. Pollock-922. Low Rarity 7. NGC graded Proof 66 CAC Approved. Gorgeous green and blue toning. A lustrous little gem specimen with a grand display of bright hues on both sides, it happens to be nicely struck as well, fully so. William Barber is credited with the seated figure (left) of Liberty, supporting a shield by her side while holding a scroll with LIBERTY in raised letters. On the reverse, the familiar Wreath of Cereals by mint engraver James Longacre, which had been used in one form or another since 1859 on Patterns and regular currency issues alike. Pop 2; none finer (PCGS # 61076) .
Estimated Value $3,500 - 4,000.
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Realized
$3,594
Lot 1052
1870 Pattern Silver Dollar. Copper, plain edge. Judd-1005. Pollock-1137. NGC graded Proof 65 Brown. Low Rarity 6. Wonderful bluish-brown iridescent toning on both sides. Feature's William Barber's modified seated Liberty design in which he switches Lady Liberty to facing left (on standard issue seated coins she faces right). William Barber was chief engraver at the Mint after the death of James B. Longacre in 1869. An older man (and father of Charles Barber, who would one day take his place as chief engraver), William Barber produced a number of interesting designs that appear on Pattern coins in the 1870s. The reverse is from the regular With Motto Proof die as used on production coins. A gem and rare thus. Pop 2; 3 finer in 66.
Estimated Value $4,500 - 5,000.
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Realized
$6,900
Lot 1053
1870 Pattern Silver Dollar. Aluminum, reeded edge. Judd-1018. Pollock-1153. PCGS graded Proof 65 Cameo. High Rarity 7. Well struck and brilliant white. The only example graded at PCGS A full-Gem Proof 65 Cameo example of Longacre's marvelous Indian Princess design, here seen in the most-desired Dollar format. The obverse depicts James B. Longacres rendition of Liberty seated, left, her hand supporting a pole with Phrygian cap on top, right hand upon on a globe of the world. Behind, conjoined flags. The reverse is of the regular design for the Seated Dollar from that years Proof die. Struck in aluminum with a reeded edge. The surfaces are vibrant and gleaming fresh, with no haze or toning on either side, which enhances the bright frosted cameo contrast of aluminum on the high raised devices. Identifiable as the finest certified by PCGS and a sure winner in any top end Pattern coin collection! Pop 1. The only example graded at PCGS.

Historic Note: This year marks the appearance of the "Standard" reverses for the silver coins from the half dime to the dollar. Probably because of lack of time to prepare suitable obverse dies, these reverses were combined with the obverses of 1869 and a new seated Liberty design by Barber. When this reverse design was combined with the Barber obverse design for the quarter, half and silver dollar and with the Longacre design for a silver dollar, unintentional mules resulted since United States of America does not appear on either side. (The "Standard Silver" series of dimes, quarters and half dollars of 1869 were again issued dated 1870.).
Estimated Value $12,000 - 14,000.
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Realized
$26,450
Lot 1054
1871 Pattern Half Dime. Copper, reeded edge. Judd-1066. Pollock-1201. Low Rarity 7. NGC graded Proof 63 Red & Brown. Mottled bluish toning on both sides on a base of warm reddish brown. The well-liked Indian Princess motif credited to James B. Longacre, but in this rendition of 1871 (two years after he died), from modified hubs and dies by Longacre's successor, William Barber. Pop 1; 1 finer in 66 RB (PCGS # 71325) .
Estimated Value $2,700 - 3,000.
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Realized
$2,300
Lot 1055
1871 Pattern Quarter Dollar. Copper, reeded edge. Judd-1097. Pollock-1233. High Rarity 6. NGC graded Proof 63 Red & Brown. Loaded with mint red. We note some scattered fly specks here and there. The reverse carries the STANDARD reverse -- there was also a STANDARD SILVER reverse on certain Patterns of 1869-71 which sometimes confuses first-time collectors as to which is which since they looked almost identical. Pop 2; 2 in 66 RB (PCGS # 71356) .

The theory behind this reduced weight STANDARD and STANDARD SILVER types was to introduce subsidiary coins into circulation. In effect, it was hoped underweight money could be used to replace the hodgepodge of Fractional Currency then clogging the streams of trade. Why reduce the weight? The belief was this would discourage hoarding and exportation as was occurring with our regular issues then being struck. The situation righted itself in 1875-79, however, and so the idea was put on the shelf for a later crisis.
Estimated Value $3,000 - 3,300.
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Realized
$2,415
Lot 1056
1938 Unofficial Pattern Nickel. Proof 64. Probably struck in the 1970's by an unknown source. An interesting item. A similar piece sold in a Heritage August 2001 Auction for $920.
Estimated Value $500-UP.
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Realized
$299






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