Goldberg Coins and Collectibles



Sale 54

Pre-Long Beach Coin and Currency Auction


The 9/09 Hawaii Collection - Hawaiian Patterns and Special Issues
 
 
Lot Photo Description Realized
Lot 1494
1881 Hawaiian Five Cents. NGC graded MS-64 Pattern KM#2. Very rare. Lightly toned. Struck in nickel. This is one of the rare original strikings, only 200 of which were minted in Paris by the owner of a New Caledonia nickel mine for presentation (and hoped-for coinage contract) to King Kalakaua in 1881. The originals are distinguished by the cross at the top of the crown. This piece is sharply made throughout with pleasant light gray patina over each side with a light ambiance of semi-prooflike reflection in a few areas. A pleasing, defect-free specimen of this Hawaiian rarity. (On the 1881 five-cent piece, the Hawaiian motto contains a misspelling on the first word. What should be UA is spelled AU.) Pop 2; 1 in MS65. (PCGS # 10975) .

Note: According to Medcalf-Russell, "many of the coins became pocket pieces or were fashioned into jewelry" -- thereby accounting for their rarity in Mint condition.
Estimated Value $20,000 - 30,000.
From the 9/09 Hawaii Collection.

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Realized
$27,600
Lot 1495
1881 Hawaiian Five Cents. NGC graded MS-63 KM-2. The obverse of this pattern features a bust left of King Kalakaua. On the 1883 coinage, the king faces right. The portrait on the five cent piece lacks the refinement of the more professionally modeled silver coins struck by the San Francisco Mint. The dies for the silver coins were engraved by the Mint's talented chief engraver, Charles E. Barber. It is unknown who engraved the dies for this piece. The obverse legend contains, in addition to the spelling error on the motto, a second blunder, referring to Kalakaua as the KING OF SANDWICH ISLANDS instead of Hawaii. The Sandwich Islands was the European term for Hawaii and was never used on official Hawaii kingdom correspondence or documents. Pop 1; 2 in 64; 1 in 65. (PCGS # 10975) .
Estimated Value $15,000 - 25,000.
Possibly Ex A.J. Ostheimer, III Collection; Privately Edwards H. Metcalf late 1960's; Feb 1976 Superior Auctions Lot #1211; From the 9/09 Hawaii Collection.

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Realized
$17,825
Lot 1496
1883 Hawaiian Eighth Dollar Silver. NGC graded Proof 62. Mostly untoned with some light golden tone. Only 20 pieces struck. Identifiable by a faint lint mark behind the king's head; also a series of faint parallel lines in the lower right obverse field. As before, the coin features a bare head right of Hawaii's last King, Kalakaua, a design in Proof that matches that appearing on the circulation strike 1883 silver coins. The reverse bears the Hawaiian denomination HAPAWALU in laurel wreath, the English equal below, EIGHTH DOL. with royal motto as legend, The Life of the Country is Perpetuated [or Preserved] in Righteousness. Splendid deeply gleaming silver contrasts with fascinating deeper border toning for outstanding visual impact.

Scarcer than the other denominations in Proof, this is one of only 20 Proof Hapawalus struck from a single pair of dies and included in Proof sets made for presentation to Hawaiian notables. It was only much later that these reached the numismatic community, after many had been inadvertently mishandled by their first owners. This seemingly off-beat denomination was first specified because it was equal to the old Spanish Real valued at 12½ cents that had long circulated in the islands and, until 1857, in the mainland U.S.A. When regular coinage began, the dime was substituted, since the San Francisco Mint already had dime planchets on hand whose use would speed the flow of the coinage. The 10-cent denomination was also a part of the American decimal system of dime, quarter, half dollar and dollar.

No Hapawalu pieces were made for circulation. This served to intensify collector pressure on the few Proofs once they learned the fact. Hapawalus have been eagerly sought by collectors for over a century now. This Proof denomination is very seldom encountered at auction. As indicated by the NGC census, this is of a mere handful certified by NGC, while the other leading grading service, PCGS, has certified two examples as Proof-66, none higher. The unparalleled auction appearance of so many rarities provides an historic pricing reference for collectors of the rare Hawaiian Proof and Mint State issues, and a chance that may not occur again in for many years. Pop 1; 3 in 61; 1 in 66.
Estimated Value $25,000 - 35,000.
From the 9/09 Hawaii Collection.

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Realized
$28,750
Lot 1497
1883 Hawaiian Eighth Dollar Silver. NGC graded Proof 61 KM-4. Lovely blue and golden toning at the periphery. Key denomination. Struck in silver with a reeded edge. The most important of the Hawaiian coins and rarely offered for sale. Of the five denominations made by Philadelphia Mint engraver Charles Barber for the Kingdom of Hawaii coins, the eighth dollar -- or HAPAWALU in the Hawaiian language (meaning half of eight, or the fraction 1/8) -- was the only one not adopted for use. When it came time to strike the circulation issue coins, an agreement was reached with the Hawaiian representatives to substitute the ten-cent piece for the hapawalu. And this denomination, along with the quarter, fifty cent, and dollar denominations were struck in proof and business strike format. That left the rare eighth coins as the only struck exclusively as Proofs. Mint records indicate 20 pieces were coined (there being 26 Proofs made of the other four denominations). The difference may be related to six proof sets that were struck at the Philadelphia Mint in September 1883 according to the Breen encyclopedia.

This piece has all of the usual hallmarks of its Proof origin: razor-sharp devices, mirror-reflective fields on both sides, sharp rims, and squared-off lettering in the legends and on the tops of the date digits, along with two-tone or frosted contrast between devices and fields. Anyone assembling a truly complete set of Hawaiian coinage will eventually have to deal with acquiring one of these. Best to take the plunge while the opportunity exists! Pop 1; 5 in 63; 1 in 66.
Estimated Value $20,000 - 30,000.
Ex Muribachi collection; From the 9/09 Hawaii Collection.

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Realized
$24,150
Lot 1498
1883 Hawaiian Eighth Dollar. NGC graded Proof 67 Red & Brown KM-4A. Struck in Copper. A wonderful rich red brown Proof. 18 struck. From the same 4-piece copper Pattern set as several of the other high-grade examples in this sale. Brilliant fiery red and gold surfaces with splashes of lilac and rose, some of the most gorgeous colors a collector will ever see on a Hawaiian pattern coin. A perfect match for the Proof 66 pattern quarter dollar from this consignment (which see). This pleasing Superb Proof example is also one of the most talked-about denominations in Hawaiian numismatics, the rare eighth dollar or "Hapawalu," only issued in Proof, none authorized for circulation. Proof patterns in copper are from the same dies that struck the silver Proofs. Pop 1; the only red brown graded at NGC.

Historic note: In their request to have coins struck by the United States government, the Hawaiian Kingdom headed by King Kalakaua ordered four denominations: a one-eighth dollar (Hapawalu), a one-quarter dollar (Hapaha), a half dollar (Hapalua), and a silver dollar (Akahi Dala). All of the denominations, except the eighth dollar, conformed to American coins in size, weight and value. Because the Hapawalu would have required specially made blanks, a ten-cent piece or Dime denomination (Umi Keneta) was substituted for the Hapawalu. No Hapawalus were struck for circulation, but when 20 special presentation Proof sets were made at the Philadelphia Mint, Hapawalus were included along with the other four denominations.

The Philadelphia Mint produced 18 Hapawalus in copper from the Proof dies and included them in four-piece sets (12 1/2c, 25c, 50c, and $1).
Estimated Value $10,000 - 15,000.
Ex: John Daggett (Superintendent, San Francisco Mint 1893-97) as part of a complete 4-piece copper Pattern set; Hallie Daggett (John Daggett's daughter); Earl Parker; sold to Gordon Medcalf, 1961; Sold to Al Ostheimer; Superior Auction Feb 1975 Lot 1540;Ronald Russell; Present Owner (9/09 Collection).

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Realized
$46,000
Lot 1499
1883 Hawaiian Eighth Dollar. NGC graded Proof 66 Brown PQ, KM-4A. Struck in Copper. Wonderful lovely blue toning on both sides a most exquisite coin and sure to delight any sophisticated buyer. It is hard to imagine how this coin survived the vicissitudes of time so well as this specimen has, the coin is extraordinary both in terms of its technical excellence and also for sheer aesthetic beauty. Pop 1; the finest graded in brown at NGC.

Humorous anecdote: Late in the 1880s, Hawaii's King Kalakaua decided (with the support of his ministers) to form a navy in an attempt to forge an alliance of the Polynesian archipelagos which had eluded outright colonization up to that time. This effort culminated in the deployment of the Kaimiloa, the only vessel of the short-lived navy of Kalakaua. Imagine the Keystone Cops and you get an indication of how well this venture fared.

In 1886, the Hawaiian government purchased for $20,000 a 171 ton former British steamer Explorer, "engaged in the copra and guano trade," Renamed Kaimiloa ("the far seeker"), repaired, refitted, and armed with six small brass cannons and two Gatling guns, the little steamer was placed in commission in March 1887, "for the naval service of the Kingdom." The ship was put under the command of Captain George E. Gresley Jackson, who was the principal of the Industrial and Reformatory School, and two dozen of the older boys in that institution were place on the Kaimiloa to be trained as seamen. "A nucleus of experienced seamen was added to the complement of the ship together with a detachment of marines recruited from the King's Guard. Of the officers, only Captain Jackson had good technical qualifications, and his were heavily discounted by his devotion to John Barleycorn." [Meaning that Jackson was a drunk.]

(Any further account of the misadventures of the Kaimiloa in Samoa that year we'll leave to the readers' imagination.).
Estimated Value $8,000 - 12,000.
Ex. the famous Muribachi collection; Auction '82 (RARCOA's session), $5,250; From the 9/09 Hawaii Collection.

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Realized
$29,900
Lot 1500
1883 Hawaiian Quarter Dollar. NGC graded Proof 66 Red & Brown Cameo M-2CPC - 2 Copper Pattern. Red and Lilac colors. 18 struck. A blazing red and brown gem of the finest order with extensive red to fire-gold hues on both surfaces. The brilliant orange centers give way to deepening shades of red near the rims and include a subtlety of lilac-rose. Soft-edged devices and lettering throughout the centers never, ever found on Proof Patterns on this issue. All are needle-sharp and keen-edged, as seen here; with production so low, it might take decades to find another example this spectacular -- if it even exists! (We doubt it exists. All things point to this specimen being the Finest Known. Certainly it is the highest graded.) What seems a miracle to us is that our consignor even found it since coins of this caliber, of this stature, tend to be locked away in famous "name" collections and passed down from father to son, rarely to see the light of day. Act boldly with your bids! Pop 1; The only cameo graded at NGC.

Please excuse us if we take a short detour down memory lane to append this (admittedly lengthy) discussion of the origin of this remarkable set of Hawaiian copper Patterns. The first owner of this set, a Mr. John Daggett, one-time superintendent of the San Francisco Mint, is also the man responsible for having had struck the 24 1894-S Barber dimes! According to Coinfacts.com's website: "In 1972, coin journalist James Johnson, attempted a complete accounting of the 1894-S story. After the article ran in Coin World Collector's Clearinghouse (9/13/72), he received a letter from Guy Chapman of California. Chapman wrote that he had been shown two of the dimes in 1954 by California dealer Earl Parker, just after Parker had acquired them from Hallie Daggett, daughter of the San Francisco Mint superintendent John Daggett. Ms. Daggett told Parker that her father had minted 24 S-mint 1894 dimes as a special request for some visiting bankers. According to her account, Daggett struck the 24 pieces and presented three coins each to seven people. The remaining three, he gave to Hallie, telling her to "put them away until she was as old as he was, at which time she would be able to sell them for a good price." (Breen) As the story goes, Hallie immediately proceeded to spend one of the dimes on ice cream, but kept the other two until she sold them to Parker."

"Today, most experts accept the "made for banker friends" theory as the more likely one. Further evidence is in the fact that all seven of the remaining high grade coins seem to be proof strikes, made from specially-prepared dies and were carefully struck. It's quite unlikely that such care would be taken simply to "round out the books," but the process is logical for such purposes as presentation to bankers."

How does a story about the 1894-S dimes relate to the top-graded Hawaiian copper Proofs we are offering in this sale? The set originated from the same source, San Francisco Mint superintendent John Daggett (1893-97); later, to his daughter Hallie Daggett, the girl who bought ice cream with an 1894-S dime! to the coin dealer Earle Parker, from whom Hawaiiana specialist Gordon Medcalf, purchased it in 1961. At some unknown time, Gordon Medcalf sold the set to another Hawaiian specialist and collector Ronald Russell (who co-authored the standard guide to Hawaiian coins with Gordon's son, Don Medcalf). It later was acquired intact by our consignor.
Estimated Value $10,000 - 15,000.
Ex: John Daggett (Superintendent, San Francisco Mint 1893-97) as part of a complete 4-piece copper Pattern set; Hallie Daggett (John Daggett's daughter); Earl Parker; sold to Gordon Medcalf, 1961; Sold to Al Ostheimer; Superior Auction Feb 1975 Lot 1540; Ronald Russell; Present Owner (9/09 Collection).

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Realized
$39,100
Lot 1501
1883 Hawaiian Quarter Dollar. NGC graded Proof 62 Brown M-2CPC-2 Copper, KM-5A. Struck in copper. Nice even toning. Only 18 struck. A quite affordable coin in this collectable grade, with the fine detail nicely displayed; variegated layers of toning envelop the surface on both sides, including some unusual but all the same very attractive shades of steel, purple, and blue, all on a base of deep graying-brown. A few light hairlines and some slight indications of contact account for the grade. Pop 1; the only brown proof graded at NGC.
Estimated Value $3,000 - 4,000.
From the 9/09 Hawaii Collection.

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Realized
$8,338
Lot 1502
1883 Hawaiian Half Dollar. NGC graded Proof 67 Red & Brown M-2CPC - 3 Copper KM-6A. A wonderful red and brown example. 18 struck. Magnificent fiery red to golden toning dominates both sides of this spectacular Gem. When carefully viewed at all angles, the full-mirror fields are seen to glisten with a watery effect while an array of subtle amber, rose, and lilac-red hues are revealed. Owing to a razor-sharp strike, the powerfully imparted details are vivid even under the strongest, most revealing magnifying glass. The undisputed rarity of this issue explains why examples seldom come on the market, even in low Proof grades. In fact, this specimen represents the Finest appearance of a copper pattern Proof hapawalu -- evidence that it is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity and the finest example to be auctioned by our firm since its inception! Pop 1; the only red & brown example graded at NGC.

The obverse of all the Hawaiian coins of 1883 is the same and features a head of King Kalakaua facing right. The half dollar has on its reverse the arms without the mantle seen on the one dollar. The legend is the same, but instead of 1 is the fraction one-half, and below, HAPALUA, signifying half-dollar. The eight stripes in quarters 1 and 4 of the shield refer to the eight inhabited islands at the time of issue. (Kahoolawe has since been put off-limits by the U.S. government due to its former use as a bombing range by the military during WWII and lately as a protected nature reserve -- irony of ironies! -- with unexploded ordnance still scattered around the site. The privately owned island of Niihau restricts visitors.).
Estimated Value $20,000 - 30,000.
Ex: John Daggett (Superintendent, San Francisco Mint 1893-97) as part of a complete 4-piece copper Pattern set; Hallie Daggett (John Daggett's daughter); Earl Parker; sold to Gordon Medcalf, 1961; Sold to Al Ostheimer; Superior Auction Feb 1975 Lot 1540;Ronald Russell; Present Owner (9/09 Collection).

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Realized
$50,600
Lot 1503
1883 Hawaiian Half Dollar. PCGS graded Proof 63 Brown PQ, Copper Pattern. Old green holder. 18 pieces struck. A sleek warm brown coin featuring steel gray accents and with with strong underlying luster plus rich reddish brown highlights on both sides. Razor-sharp, as expected, indeed fully struck and with a partial knife-edge or "fin" (the term used by the Mint). A Proof pattern coin that gets honorable mention where fullness of design is concerned. One of two copper half dollars featured in this incredible collection of Hawaiian coins!

All pattern trial pieces were dated 1883 and struck in copper from the same dies used for the 1883 Kingdom of Hawaii silver coins. Eighteen sets (without the umi keneta or dime) were struck in copper. When approved, all denominations were struck in silver Proof, with the dime eventually adopted in place of the eighth dollar so that the Hawaiian coins would be similar to the U.S. silver coins. (U.S. coins also circulated in the Islands). Pop 1; 1 in Proof 65 BN; 1 in Proof 66 BN.
Estimated Value $10,000 - 12,000.
From the 9/09 Hawaii Collection.

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Realized
$14,375
Lot 1504
1883 Hawaiian Dollar. NGC graded Proof 65 Red & Brown M-CPC4 Copper Pattern. Lovely shades of red colors. Only 18 minted. From an original 4-piece set of copper Patterns. This amazing coin's beautiful fiery golden red cameo devices seem to float on the essentially flawless deep liquid-molten gold fields. A few subtle hairlines are seen in the obverse field, but these are of no importance where the generally majestic eye appeal is concerned. The gleaming coppery fields subtly contrast with a hint of toning that overlays the entire surface both obverse and reverse.

The larger diameter of the one-dollar denomination allowed the mint to place the entire Hawaiian coat of arms and supporters on the piece. It features an elaborate ermine mantle on this reverse. Over the years, strong growth of interest in Hawaiiana collecting has driven the interest in such pieces to heights unimagined by collectors and coin dealers of the 1960s and 1970s when these were more or less relegated to the backwaters of American numismatics.

Only the one Proof copper dollar has been graded by NGC at this level (see below) which means that bidders have a fair shot at owning what has to be the Finest Known copper pattern dollar of the Kingdom of Hawaii. This specimen is truly spectacular. It is perfectly possible that the present glittering Proof to become the centerpiece in a collection of Hawaiian coins. Pop 1; the only example graded in RB at NGC.

Kalakaua I, born David La'amea Kamanakapu'u Mahinulani Nalaiaehuokalani Lumialani Kalakaua and sometimes called The Merrie Monarch (November 16, 1836 - January 20, 1891), was the last reigning king of the Kingdom of Hawaii. He served in office from February 12, 1874 until his death at the Palace Hotel in San Francisco, California, on January 20, 1891.

When King Kamehameha V, the last monarch of the Kamehameha dynasty, died on December 12, 1872 without naming a successor to the throne several candidates arose, including William C. Lunalilo and Kalakaua. Lunalilo was the more popular of the two while Kalakaua was much more conservative than his main opponent, Lunalilo.

On January 1, 1873, a popular election was held for the office of King of Hawaii. Lunalilo won with an overwhelming majority. The next day, the legislature confirmed the popular vote and elected Lunalilo unanimously. Kalakaua conceded.

However, barely a year later, Lunalilo died on February 3, 1874. (King Lunalilo did not enjoy good health during his reign. He had some bad health habits; for example, he was an alcoholic like many of the Hawaiian kings.) With his death, Kalakaua was elected to replace him, supported by the legislature although many of the populace, mainly the native Hawaiian and British subjects in the Kingdom, preferred Queen Dowager Emma, who stood against him.

Upon ascending the throne, Kalakaua named his brother, William Pitt Leleiohoku, as his heir, putting an end to the era of elected kings in Hawaii.
Estimated Value $20,000 - 30,000.
Ex: John Daggett (Superintendent, San Francisco Mint 1893-97) as part of a complete 4-piece copper Pattern set; Hallie Daggett (John Daggett's daughter); Earl Parker; sold to Gordon Medcalf, 1961; Sold to Al Ostheimer; Superior Auction Feb 1975 Lot 1540;Ronald Russell; Present Owner (9/09 Collection).

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Realized
$89,125
Lot 1505
1883 Hawaiian Dollar. NGC graded Proof 62 Brown M-CPC4 Copper, KM-7A. Struck in Copper. Nicely toned. A few random surface marks including a tiny tic by Kalakaua's lips. Only 18 struck. Pop 1; 1 finer in PF66 Brown. Only 2 examples graded in PF Brown at NGC.

For a Proof, a sleek deep steel brown specimen with an even flow of subtle transitions from lighter to darker hues on both sides. Attractively struck as well, with just outstanding detail in the major devices, showing all of the sharp depth imparted by the dies. These dies were engraved by the mint's chief engraver, Charles E. Barber, who is famous for his Barber dime, quarter dollar, and half dollar, among others. It was Barber who was given the photographs and drawings for this particularly pleasing design. At the time of issue, comments favorable to the King and his coins came in from all directions, comparing the quality of workmanship to the finest designs on European and British coins of the realm then circulating. The numismatist will no doubt enjoy hours of pleasure studying this copper pattern for the Hawaiian dollar. A magnifying glass reveals all the intricacies of Barber's handiwork with amazing detail.

Contrary to some rulers, Kalakaua sported a good head of hair and a typical full beard of the era, which is rendered here in all its dignified style. Two years before this coin's issuance, Kalakaua embarked on an around-the-world trip where he met leaders and potentates from numerous countries -- and is believed to be the first Monarch to do so in modern world history.

According to Kuykendall, "The king and his suite left Honolulu on the steamer City of Sidney, January 20, 1881, going first to San Francisco. During a stay of about ten days in California, Kalakaua was extensively entertained by personal friends and public officials in the bay area and in the state capital, Sacramento." His journey then took him to Japan, where he met with the emperor and his court. He visited a number of the main cities of Japan before the journey continued to the Malay States and Burma. Then it was on to India, Egypt, across the Mediterranean to Italy where he re-entered the Western world after four months of travel through Oriental lands. Because it was so late in the season by then, the first week of July, Kalakaua decided to go on to England where he was elaborately entertained by Queen Victoria. There were strong business ties between England and Hawaii, and the Hawaiian Monarch was received with "every mark of distinction," according to Kukyendall. One diplomatic informant writes to his friend at this time, "I desire to assure you that the many persons who have met His Majesty, since His arrival here, express themselves as highly pleased with His Majesty's appearance, bearing, and intelligence, and I am compelled to believe that this visit is of great advantage to the Hawaiian islands in creating a just and proper idea of the civilization of our nation."

After eighteen days in England, Kalakaua returned to the continent and visited Belgium, Germany, Austria, France, Spain, and Portugal, before heading to New York and Philadelphia and then on to Washington where Pres. Chester A. Arthur had very recently become president of the United States following the death of Garfield. He left San Francisco near the end of October for the trip back to Hawaii, where he "received a joyous and tumultuous welcome."
Estimated Value $8,000 - 10,000.
From the 9/09 Hawaii Collection.

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Realized
$18,975






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