Goldberg Coins and Collectibles



Sale 38

Manuscript and Collectibles Auction


Authors
 
 
Lot Photo Description Realized
Lot 146
Beard, Daniel C (1850-1941) Founder of the Boy Scouts of America; author; teacher. Signature and date, "Dave Beard 1909," 2½x4", n.p. Fine; loosely mounted on a biographical sheet.
Estimated Value $100 - 150.
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Lot 147
Bellow, Saul (1915 -) Canadian-born American novelist; Nobel Prize winner (1976); author of novels such as Adventures of Augie March (1953), Herzog (1964), and Humboldt's Gift ((1975). Autograph Letter Signed "Saul," 5 pp (3 sheets of yellow legal pad), 12½x8" (Minneapolis, Minnesota) (11 May 1959). Very Fine. With holograph envelope addressed to Herbert Gold and "Bellow" in the return address. Bellow discusses Gold's novel The Optimist and makes some incisive comments on his own works. In part: "The Optimist is the best novel you've written….I was glad to see you take a Balzacian turn, into social interests, into politics….An old fellow, a Yiddish journalist…told me…'Your pen has powerrr.' This I bequeath to you…. I've always avoided hurting my favorites. I've given all the injuries to the poor Wilhelms, the men of burlap.The men of fine silk I've overprotected…." Much more interesting content.
Estimated Value $600 - 900.
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Realized
$368
Lot 148
Bryant, William Cullen (1794-1878) American poet. Signature and date, "March 30, 1860" on a toned piece of paper, 1½x3¾". Very good. With a used Christmas postcard carrying a verse by Bryant.
Estimated Value $100 - 200.
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Lot 149
Burroughs, Edgar Rice (1875-1950) American novelist, best known for creating the character of Tarzan. Document Signed "E R Burroughs" as president of Edgar Rice Burroughs, Inc., 2pp, 13x8½", 15 May 1924. Very good This is the original copy of the agreement between Burroughs and A.C. McClurg & Company for the publication of Tarzan And The Ant Men, the tenth book in the Tarzan series (Tarzan of the Apes was the first in 1912).
Estimated Value $700 - 900.
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Realized
$1,200
Lot 150
Cain, James M (1872-1977) Crime novelist. His three most famous novels, The Postman Always Rings Twice (1934), Mildred Pierce (1941) and Double Indemnity (1943), were made into film noir classics. Typed Letter Signed "Jim" on personal letterhead, 1p, 11x8½", Hyattsville, MD, 18 Nov. 1966. To H.N. Swanson, regarding a contract Swanson can't find, and mentioning Double Indemnity and Mildred Pierce. "….in connection with Mildred Pierce, we have something to sell…the characters and their free & unlimited use…."
Estimated Value $300 - 400.
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Realized
$316
Lot 151
Chandler, Raymond (1870-1959) Crime novelist; creator of hard-boiled private eye, Phillip Marlowe. Typed Document Signed, 1p, 11x8½", n.p., 17 Nov. 1944. Very fine. Chandler signs in acceptance of the termination of his employment agreement with Paramount Pictures Inc. as of December 11, 1944. Chandler first worked for Paramount in 1943 when he adapted writer James M. Cain's Double Indemnity for director Billy Wilder; the movie was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Screenplay.
Estimated Value $900 - 1,200.
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Lot 152
Chayefsky, Sidney Aaron "Paddy" (1923-1981) Writer of teleplays for live television, playwright and screenwriter. Document Signed, 1p, 11x8½", New York, 9 Aug. 1948. Fine; file holes at top. A contract between William Morris Agency and Chayefsky for a play titled "Put Them All Together." This was Chayefsky's second play, later retitled "M is for Mother"; it was never produced.
Estimated Value $200 - 300.
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Lot 153
Clemens, Samuel L (1835-1910) Author, lecturer, satirist, and humorist; he wrote under the pseudonym Mark Twain. Document Signed "SLC" four times, with nineteen lines in Clemens' hand, 2pp, 11x8½", n.p., c. 1890. Very fine. The document pertains to the Paige automatic typesetting machine, in which Clemens invested and lost an enormous amount of money (a 17 Sept. 2006 Los Angeles Times article figured that Clemens lost about $4 million in today's dollars in this venture), and which, along with the failure of his publishing company, forced him to declare bankruptcy in 1894.

The purpose of this document was was to entice Senator John Percival Jones (1829-1912), a five-term U.S. senator from Nevada who made a fortune in mining, to invest in the machine. Clemens touts its wonders and its advantages over other machines, such as the Mergenthaler or Rogers. A letter from a Mr. Pasko, enthusing over the machine, is quoted on page one: "I regard your machine as the most ingenious piece of machinery it has ever been my pleasure to see…." Clemens added three handwritten notes on the first page, each signed "SLC" and two on the second page, one of them signed "SLC." One note reads: "This record is not quite complete. Whitmore was in his 36th day when the machine stopped; & he had then reached 7,000 an hour. When our apprentices reach 9,000 an hour we shall move the machine to New York. SLC." All of the notes add additional information on the Paige machine, which turned out to be an unmitigated disaster. Clemens was saved from total financial disaster by his writings and lectures.
Estimated Value $3,500 - 5,000.
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Lot 154
Coward, Noel (1899-1973) English playwright, actor, and composer. Program of "London's Festival Ballet / Tenth Anniversary Season / Summer 1959" Signed, 24 pp, 11x8½", original blue wrappers, 1st edition. Coward signed in blue ink next to a photo showing him at the piano, in a two-page spread featuring his charming article "London Morning," describing the ballet of the same name for which he created the story and music. Signed on the same page by Jack Carter (choreographer), Anton Dolin (artistic director), John Gilpin (dancer - he also signed a 2nd page), and Beatrice Lilly.
Estimated Value $300 - 500.
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Lot 155
Dickens, Charles (1812-70) British novelist; author of classics such as Pickwick Papers, Oliver Twist, The Old Curiosity Shop, A Christmas Carol, David Copperfield, and A Tale of Two Cities. Autograph Letter Signed on letterhead engraved "Gad's Hill Place, Higham by Rochester, Kent," 2½ pp, 7x4½", 29 July 1868. Fine; accompanied by the original transmittal envelope, addressed in Dicken's hand and signed in the lower left corner, with Dicken's embossed "C.D." seal on the flap. To T.J. Serle, a dramatic author who was acting manager of Covent Garden Theatre in 1838, when his acquaintance with Charles Dickens began. Dickens answers some questions regarding the extension of copyright to the United States, and refers to a horrible train wreck on 9 June 1865, in which Dickens was involved and from which he never fully recovered. In part: "I do not believe there is the slightest chance of an international copyright law being passed in America for a long time to come. Some Massachusetts men do believe in such a thing, but they fail (as I think) to take into account the powerful Western Opposition. Such an alteration as you suggest in the English law would give no copyright in America…." He explains in detail, then adds, "On that horrible Staplehurst day, I had not the slightest idea that I knew any one in the train….It's remarkable that my watch (a special chronometer) has never gone quite correctly since. And to this day there sometimes comes over me - on a railway, in a hansom - in any sort of conveyance - for a few seconds a vague sense of dread that I have no power to check. It comes and passes, but I cannot prevent its coming…."
Estimated Value $2,000 - 3,000.
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Realized
$11,213
Lot 156
Doyle, Arthur Conan, Sir (1859-1930) British novelist; creator of "Sherlock Holmes." Autograph Note Signed ("A Conan Doyle") in black ink, 1p, 7x5¼", Windlesham, Crowborough, Sussex, 24 June (New York). Fine. To Ronald Gorell Barnes, third Baron Gorell (1884-1963): "Dear Lord Gorell / I dont need any more proofs. It is very well printed…." Lord Gorell was President of the Society of Authors (1928-35).
Estimated Value $400 - 600.
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Realized
$357
Lot 157
Farrell, James T (1904-79) American novelist known for his naturalistic style; among his best-known works is his Studs Lonigan trilogy. Autograph Letter Signed, on ruled notebook paper, 12 separate pages, 10½x8", New York, 26 Feb. Fine; included are three envelopes with holograph addresses and Farrell's signature in the return address. To Gilbert Gibson, refusing to send a signed photo but taking the time to scrawl a long letter about being a writer and to vent some of the grievances he feels against a commercial world not always receptive to his work. In brief: "…Writing is the dedication of my life. For my writing, I have risked my life; I have faced a man with a gun; I have been sued, slandered and insulted; I have gone hungry; I have written in pain….I have not been a writer to be a pinup image of 62 years of age. I have written…as an artist, critic, thinker, journalist, essayist, etc. I never ask to be read, let alone liked….I would reach those heads and hearts that will respond in a common effort for the finest cause of all--the solidarity and liberation of mankind.…" Much more content.
Estimated Value $400 - 600.
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Realized
$920
Lot 158
Fitzgerald, F. Scott (1896-1940) American writer; the premier novelist of the Jazz Age. Autograph Letter Signed, 1 p., 10¾x8¼", Villa St. Louis, Juan-les-Pins, Alpes Maritime, France, 17 July 1926. Very good; uneven toning and some fading of ink to a few words. Written while The Great Gatsby was on the best-seller list, to "Dear Jimmy," probably James Rennie, the actor who played the lead in the Broadway production of The Great Gatsby, regarding Fitzgerald's attempts to convert the book Brigham Young by M.R. Werner into a play. "…I sobered up in Paris and spent three days trying to get Brigham into shape. Then down here I worked on it some more and made a tentative working outline. But I don't believe that I could make the grade and the more I struggle with it the more I'm convinced that I'd simply ruin your idea by making a sort of half-ass compromise between my amateur idea of 'good theatre' and Werner's book. I think your instinct has led you to a great idea but that my unsolicited offer was based more on enthusiasm than on common sense. So I bequeath you the notion of the girl which I think in other hands could be made quite solid, and rather ungracefully retire hoping that Connolly or Craig will make you the sort of vehicle of it that's in your imagination….You're a man after my own heart and I feel that we have by no means seen the last of each other, even in a theatrical way. My love to Dorothy - it was so nice of you both to come and see Zelda…." Zelda was recovering from an appendectomy at this time. According to Fitzgerald biographer, Andrew Turnbull, the author went out on the town every night with James Rennie during the two weeks Zelda was in the hospital.
Estimated Value $2,000 - 3,000.
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Realized
$7,188
Lot 159
Frost, Robert (1874-1963) Poet; Pulitzer Prize winner: 1924, '31, '37, and '43. Printed portrait Inscribed and Signed "Robert Frost to James Patric Murphy / 1942" in blue ink, 6½x4½", n.p. Printed under the portrait is "Robert Frost. From a Portrait by Enit Kaufman." Fair condition; tear from lower left edge to center affects the printed word "From" but does not affect Frost's script.
Estimated Value $400 - 600.
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Realized
$403
Lot 160
Frost, Robert. A copy of "Two Tramps In Mud-Time," signed at the end of the poem and inscribed on the title page "To Percy Boynton," 6 pp, 6¼x4½". Printed by The Spiral Press in New York, the title page notes that this is "A New Poem by Robert Frost Sent With Holiday Greetings From Elinor & Robert Frost Christmas 1934." Frost penned the words "more than" in blue ink above "Holiday Greetings." The poem has paper covers, bound with thread. Accompanied by the address panel of the envelope, penned in Frost's hand to Professor Percy H. Boynton, Department of English, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. What a wonderful gift for the recipients!
Estimated Value $400 - 600.
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Realized
$863
Lot 161
Grey, Zane (1875-1939) American novelist; best known for westerns such as Riders of the Purple Sage (1912). Two Autograph cards signed in purple ink, 1½x3", n.p., n.d. Fine.
Estimated Value $150 - 200.
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Lot 162
Hammett, Dashell. Document Signed, 3pp, 11x8½", Culver City, California, 19 June 1935. Also signed for MGM by Eddie Mannix. The contract engages Hammett to serve as an assistant to Thin Man director Hunt Stromberg, including serving as "a general editorial aide and/or as an assistant and/or advisor not only in connection with the preparation of stories and/or continuities, but as well in connection with the actual production of photoplays…and generally to render your services as a motion picture executive…." Hammett was to be paid $1,000 per week, except during periods when he alone would be required "to write the complete continuity including dialogue for any photoplay," at which time he would receive $1750 per week.
Estimated Value $2,500 - 3,000.
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Lot 163
Heller, Joseph (1923- 1999) American satirist best known for the World War II classic Catch-22; the phrase "Catch 22" has entered the English language to mean a no-win situation. Souvenir Page from Catch-22 Signed in black ink at lower right, 11x8½", n.p., n.d. Excellent condition.
Estimated Value $200 - 300.
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Lot 164
Hemingway, Ernest. Typed Letter Signed twice ("Papa"), 2 separate pages, 12x8¼", The Finca (Cuba), 26 July 1949. To screenwriter Peter Viertel, with lots of news and two holograph words added. In small part: "…was getting in good shape (really) when got socked by that infection. Had been shooting duck and getting out to the blinds in a 55 mile wind when got hit in the corner of the eye with a pushing pole…got straphlococcus [sic]…had to have 13 million units of Penicil…so hope to live to kick the shit out of Irwin or any of those jerks….Was 50 last Thursday….Been working fine since guests left and kids got off to Europe….About where to go in the winter am sad s.o.b. if know. This joint costs about $500 and up a month to run. I'll be running out of dough before Xmas. Can always borrow but don't want to. Simplest to stay in joint and work….Am sort of pee-ed off on Sun Valley …. Think should go to a new country and loan new money to new faces….I feel like a dope to leave if am working good and not stale….I miss the way it used to be in Montana, Wyoming and even Idaho like hell. But it isn't that way anymore….I don't know any place left in the states where it's the kind of wild I like…." Much more content. A super letter.
Estimated Value $4,000 - 6,000.
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Lot 165
Holmes, Oliver Wendell (1809-94) Poet, wit, man of letters, physician. Autograph Quotation Signed on a 2½x4" card, being four lines from his poem, "The Voiceless": "A few can touch the magic string / And noisy Fame is proud to win them, -- Alas for those who never sing, But die with all their music in them! Oliver Wendell Holmes / Boston, Feb. 26th 1889." Light toning, else fine.
Estimated Value $300 - 500.
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Realized
$184
Lot 166
Holmes, Oliver Wendell, Sr. Card or piece of paper signed, "Oliver Wendell Holmes Beverly Farms, Mass. July 28th 1893," 2½x4". Handsomely matted and framed with an image of Holmes, a name plaque, and a biographical plaque; the overall size is 18¾x21¾". Ready for display.
Estimated Value $200 - 300.
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Lot 167
Howe, Julia Ward (1819-1910) Writer, poet, reformer, and lecturer; best remembered for having authored "The Battle Hymn of the Republic." Autograph Quotation Signed, 1 page, 4½x7¼", Boston 26 Feb. 1865. Handsomely matted and framed to an overall size of 10x12¾". Being the first verse of the much-loved, patriotic song that Howe wrote in 1862 as an inspiration to Union soldiers fighting against slavery. Autograph quotations signed by Howe during the 1880s are not uncommon, but such an early date as this quotation, written only three years after she composed the song, are extremely rare. In full:

" In the beauty of the lilies Christ was born across the sea, With a glory in his bosom that transfigures you and me; As he died to make men holy, let us die to make men free, While God is marching on. Julia Ward Howe. Boston, Feb. 26th 1865."


The story of how Julia Ward Howe came to compose her famous song is an interesting one. Julia and her husband George were involved in volunteer work with the Sanitary Commission (which provided care for Union soldiers), and were consequently invited to Washington by President Lincoln in 1862. While visiting a Union Army camp in Virginia, they heard the men singing a catchy tune about the death of radical abolitionist, John Brown, who was hanged for taking over the Federal arsenal at Harper's Ferry and trying to provoke a slave rebellion in 1859. A clergyman in the party, James Freeman Clarke, who knew that Julia wrote poems, urged her to write a new one for the war effort. She described the events later::

"I replied that I had often wished to do so…. in spite of the excitement of the day I went to bed and slept as usual, but awoke the next morning in the gray of the early dawn, and to my astonishment found that the wished-for lines were arranging themselves in my brain. I lay quite still until the last verse had completed itself in my thoughts, then hastily arose, saying to myself, I shall lose this if I don't write it down immediately. I searched for an old sheet of paper and an old stub of a pen which I had had the night before, and began to scrawl the lines almost without looking, as I learned to do by often scratching down verses in the darkened room when my little children were sleeping. Having completed this, I lay down again and fell asleep, but not before feeling that something of importance had happened to me."

The resulting poem was first published in February 1862 in the Atlantic Monthly (see next lot), and called "Battle Hymn of the Republic." When it was put to the tune of "John Brown's Body," it became the best known Civil War song of the North. Although an important reformer for world peace and woman's suffrage (with Lucy Stone she founded the New England Women's Club, which later became the American Woman Suffrage Association), Howe will always be remembered as the author of "The Battle Hymn of the Republic."
Estimated Value $7,000 - 9,000.
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Lot 168
Howe, Julia Ward - With First Printing of "Battle Hymn of the Republic". Signature on a 2¼x4½" card, with a copy of the February 1862 issue of The Atlantic Monthly (Boston: Ticknor and Firlds), containing the first printing of "Battle Hymn of the Republic." Paper covers are toned and worn, split at the spine and partially held together with old tape; the inside pages are tightly bound with string and only lightly toned. There are a few marks above "Battle Hymn of the Republic," which is printed as a poem, on the first page of the magazine, having five stanzas. This published version has a few changes from Howe's manuscript version, written in 1861, and a sixth stanza was not included. (For the story of how Mrs. Howe came to write the poem that became the most popular Northern song of the Civil War, see the description of the previous lot).
Estimated Value $2,000 - 3,000.
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Lot 169
Huxley, Aldous (1894-1963) British author, best known for Brave New World. Document Signed, 1p, 11x8½", Beverly Hills, California, 23 June 1952. Fine; light toning and file holes at top. A contract between the William Morris Agency, Huxley, and Ralph Rose, regarding representnation of the play "After Many A Summer Dies The Swan," based on the novel by Huxley and dramatized by Rose.
Estimated Value $300 - 400.
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Lot 170
Kesey, Ken (1935 -2001) American author and counter-cultural figure, best known for his novel, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest. Souvenir Page from One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest Signed in red and green across the text, 11x8½", n.p., n.d. Excellent condition.
Estimated Value $200 - 300.
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Realized
$120
Lot 171
Kipling, Rudyard (1865-1936) Novelist; poet; winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature. Typed Letter Signed, on engraved stationery, 1 p, 6¼x8", Bateman's Burwash, Sussex, 14 Aug. 1909. Very good; folded and affixed to a biographical sheet. To an unidentified correspondent, returning a file of correspondence (not present) and regretting "that as I know nothing about the business side of inventions it is out of my power to assist you."
Estimated Value $175 - 225.
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Realized
$108
Lot 172
Kipling, Rudyard. Signature on a small piece of paper, laid to a 1½x3" Autograph card, n.p., n.d. Fine.
Estimated Value $150 - 200.
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Lot 173
Lawrence, D.H (1885-1930) British novelist, critic, poet, and painter; one of the greatest figures in 20th century English literature. Autograph Letter Signed, 2 pp, 8½x7", Chalet Beau Site, Les Diablerets (Vaud), Suisse, 4 Feb. 1928. Very good; two minor corner repairs, and a few edge chips and small splits, affecting no text but one slightly affecting the "H" in the signature. To "Dear Mason" (Harold T. Mason of Centaur Books in Philadelphia), discussing the problems of publishing and circulating Lady Chatterley's Lover. "…I'm going over my novel here - the typescript - and I'm going to try to expurgate and substitute sufficiently to produce a properish public version for Alf Knopf, presumably, to publish. But I want to publish the unmutilated version myself in Florence - 1000 copies in all - half for England. I shall send out no review copies. I shall make no advertisement - just circulate a few little slips announcing the publication. Then, perhaps, if I post direct from Florence to all private individuals before I send any copies to England, so that there can be no talk beforehand - perhaps that would be safest. I'm terribly afraid a crate might arouse suspicion, and the whole thing be lost. We might crate 50 copies to you - or more even. You needn't look on them as ordered: perhaps to the other bookshops you mention too. But I daren't crate the whole damn thing. What do you think? I'll be glad if you'll help me. But I'll send a set of proofs. - Write to the Villa Mirenda, we shall be back there in early March, I suppose. We are here for the time in the snow to see if it'll do my chest any good. I think it does. Will you please send by book post a copy of that porcupine to Aldous Huxley….It's a shame it's still on your hands. It'll sell one day - too late for all of us probably. And thanks for the money. I shall send the MS to the printer as soon as I get it revised - but I don't want to bring out the unexpurgated edition long before the public one…."

Lady Chatterley's Lover was inspired by the affair between Lawrence's aristocratic German wife, Frieda, and an Italian peasant (who would become her third husband after Lawrence's death), and by Lawrence's struggle with sexual impotence. It was considered pornographic because of its explicit descriptions of sexual relations, its liberal use of four letter words, and the depiction of a love affair between a bourgeois female and a working-class male. Lawrence did publish the book privately in Florence in 1928. It was not published in the UK until 1960, at which time it became the subject of an obscenity trial. After several academic critics testified that the work had literary merit, a "not guilty" verdict was rendered and became the basis for publishing more explicit material in the UK. In the United States, Grove Press published an unexpurgated version of Lady Chatterley's Lover in 1959 and copies sent through the mail were confiscated. A lawsuit ensued, resulting in the ban being overturned against Lady Chatterley's Lover, as well as against Tropic of Cancer and Fanny Hill.
Estimated Value $3,000 - 5,000.
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Realized
$3,795
Lot 174
London, Jack (1876-1916) American novelist and short-story writer. He wrote over 50 books, fiction and non fiction, and hundreds of short stories. His best-known novels include The Call of the Wild (1903), The Sea Wolf (1903), and White Fang (1906). Typed Letter Signed, 1 p, 6½x8½", Glen Ellen, Sonoma Co., California, 17 Mar. 1914. Fine. To Sadie Wolf of New York City: "..I would refer you to my JOHN BARLEYCORN [London's 1913 publication discussing alcoholism] for the personal statement which you desire. I herewith give you my permission so to use same. Under separate cover I am mailing you autographed copy [not included] of a novel of mine entitled ADVENTURE, in which I have pasted my photograph.…."
Estimated Value $900 - 1,100.
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Lot 175
Lowell, James Russell (1819-91) American poet, critic, and editor. Autograph Quotation Signed ("J.R. Lowell"), 2¾x4¾", Cambridge, 21 Oct. 1859. Very fine. "O Thou whose youth is yet all Spring, Faith, blighted once is past retrieving; Experience is a dumb dead thing, The victory's in believing." With a 9½x7" image of Lowell.
Estimated Value $250 - 300.
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Lot 176
Luce, Clare Boothe (1903-87) American playwright, journalist, politician, and diplomat. Typed Letter Signed ("Clare" and "C"), with numerous holograph corrections, 1 p, 10 1/4x7 ¼", n.p., n.d. Fine. To "Clifton Dear," (Broadway and film actor Clifton Webb) recommending Father Thomas McCarthy as a spiritual advisor: "He is…brilliant enough to engage a mind like yours…." Much religious content; Luce converted to Roman Catholicism after her daughter Ann was killed in a car accident in 1946.
Estimated Value $150 - 200.
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Lot 177
Miller, Arthur (1915 2005) American playwright, essayist and author; his best-known works are The Crucible, A View from the Bridge, All My Sons, and Death of a Salesman. Souvenir Page from Act One of Death of a Salesman Signed in blue ink at upper right, 11x8½", n.p.,n.d. Excellent condition.
Estimated Value $200 - 300.
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Lot 178
Mitchell, Margaret (1900-49) Author of the enormously popular novel, Gone With the Wind (1936); winner of the 1937 Pulitzer Prize. Typed Letter Signed "Margaret Mitchell Marsh," on engraved letterhead, 1p., 11x7¼", Atlanta, Georgia, 1 Apr. 1940. Fine; light toning and a couple of tiny contemporary ink spots. Written to Mrs. K.S. Howlett of Franklin, Tennessee, regarding Mrs. Howlett's comments on Gone With the Wind and her invitation to visit historic spots in Franklin, including the Civil War battlefield. Original transmittal envelope and a postcard photo of Miss Mitchell is included, as well as a 1994 affidavit from Mrs. Howlett's granddaughter, stating that the letter had remained in the family until that date.

In part: "That was a lovely letter you wrote me about 'Gone With the Wind'… You wrote so many things well calculated to make me happy but the nicest thing you wrote was that you thought my book had done 'more to bring the Old South to our children and grandchildren than any Southern history has done.' I am especially grateful to you for those words. You do indeed live upon an historic spot. I have never visited the battlefield at Franklin but I have read so much about it that I feel I have actually seen it. As a child I heard stories of that battle from the lips of survivors and they said it was the bloodiest and most bitter fight of the whole war. I am especially fond of a book named 'Co. Aitch,' by Sam Watkins….His description of the appearance of the battlefield after the fight is enough to bring chills….Business matters rising from 'Gone With the Wind' have kept me tied to my desk for nearly four years, but I hope some day I can visit Franklin."
Estimated Value $3,000 - 5,000.
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Realized
$2,300
Lot 179
(O'Hara, John) (1905-70) American author and screenwriter. 14K gold Cartier cigarette case, 3½x3½", 140 grams, enclosed in a red-fitted, leather presentation case stamped on the base "Cartier." Very fine. Engraved on the lid: "To John O'Hara from Phyllis and Bennett with our love June 1960." This exquisite cigarette case was a gift from Random House president Bennet Cerf (1898-1971) and his wife Phyllis to best-selling author and screen writer John O'Hara, author of "Appointment in Samarra," "From the Terrace," "Butterfield 8," "Pal Joey," etc. Random House published two works by O'Hara in 1960: "Ourselves to Know" and the three-volume "Sermons and Soda-Water."
Estimated Value $2,000 - 2,500.
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Lot 180
(Poe, Edgar Allan). Eleven-page manuscript, 8x5", tied by ribbon, written by one Ashby Wilkens of Columbia, Tennessee, February 12, 1876, as part of a contest to determine the best Southern writer. Fine except for toned first page. The writer declares that no poems in the English language can compare with Poe's and that "his prose pieces are unrivaled in their word painting and their power of subtle analysis…." With transcript and a partial copy of a c. 1906 literary magazine, "Southern Literature."
Estimated Value $200 - 300.
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Realized
$115
Lot 181
Proust, Marcel (1871-1922) French novelist; most famous for the series of novels published under the title À la recherche du temps perdu. Autograph Letter Signed "Your Marcel" on black-bordered stationery, 2¼ pp, n.p., 1 Jan. n.y. (c. 1904 or ' 05) Fine; some ink transfer, primarily on blank portion of signature page. In French, to Lucien Daudet, "My dear little Lucien," son of writer Alphonse Daudet. With translation. In part: "Today the first of January, when one thinks of the future, like you, and with you, I think of the past, and of him whom we will no longer see, to whom I would have wished a Happy New Year, and good health. My dear little one, you will never know how close I am to you. Perhaps it is wrong of me to tell you, as my letters and and visits have gone unanswered, or perhaps you have so much to write, and so little desire to do so, but no matter what, don't forget me. The past years have brought you so many unpleasant things that I haven't the courage to wish you anything for the New Year. It won't erase any less the memories and sadness which make me love you even more. Your Marcel." Proust was probably referring to his father, who died in the fall of 1903, as the person "whom we will no longer see"; his beloved mother would die in September of 1905. Lucien Daudet was an artist and possibly Proust's lover. With translation.
Estimated Value $1,500 - 2,500.
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Realized
$4,140
Lot 182
Sandburg, Carl. Biography of Sandburg by Harry Golden Signed on the second endpage by Sandburg in black ink and by the author in blue ink, 8¾x6", New York: The World Publishing Company, 273 pp, plus index. Dust jacket has minor problems at spine edges, else very good.
Estimated Value $250 - 300.
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Unsold
Lot 183
Sherwood, Robert E (18961955) American playwright, editor, and screenwriter; winner of four Pulitzer Prizes. Autograph Letter Signed, 1p, 10x8", Surrey (England), 15 July 1937. Fine. To "Connie" an actress who appeared in Idiot's Delight (it won the Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1936), expressing his sadness that the show is closing and saying "Never have I had so much satisfaction or so much fun from a show…" More content.
Estimated Value $125 - 150.
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Lot 184
Singer, Isaac Bashevis (1904-91) Polish-born American author of novels and short stories in the Yiddish language; 1978 Nobel Prize winner. His works were heavily influenced by Jewish folklore, myticism, and religion. Three items, two signed "Isaac B. Singer" and one "I.B. Singer" in English and Yiddish: (1) An Autograph Letter Signed on personal, engraved letterhead, 1 p. 10½x7¼", New York City. To Rabbi Wolf [Alfred Wolfe] of Wilshire Blvd. Temple regarding a writers' and psychologists' conference that Singer was going to attend in Los Angeles. (2) An announcement, signed at the top, of a lecture to be made by Singer at the temple; with two admittance tickets. (3) A 10x8" black and white waist-up photograph inscribed on the back to Gerry and Flavia (Burg), who were members of the temple. All very fine.
Estimated Value $400 - 600.
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Lot 185
Smith, Samuel Francis (1808 1895) Baptist minister; composer of "America". Autograph Quotation Signed ("S.F. Smith"), being the first three lines of "America," written on a 2x3¾" piece of paper in medium ink and dated April 11, 1895, the year of Smith's death. Very good; small paper loss under, and not affecting, Smith's signature; toned area with tear under date, slightly affecting the lower edge of two numbers. In full: "My country, 'tis of thee, Sweet land of liberty, Of thee I sing." S.F. Smith / Written in 1832, April 11, 1895." Smith attended Harvard from 1825 to 1829, and was a classmate of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. To help pay for his tuition, he did translations from several foreign languages into English and wrote magazine and newspaper articles. In 1832, a friend asked him to translate a German poem that was set to music. Smith liked the music so much that he wrote English lyrics for it, and "America" was born.
Estimated Value $600 - 800.
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Realized
$518
Lot 186
Stowe, Harriet Beecher (1811-96) Author; most famous for Uncle Tom's Cabin (1851-52), which aroused sentiment in the North of the U.S. against slavery. Signature with sentiment and date, "Very truly yours / H.B. Stowe / June 26 1877," 2¼x3½", n.p. Fine.
Estimated Value $250 - 350.
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Unsold
Lot 187
Tolstoy, Leo (1828-1910) Russian novelist and moral philosopher; best known for War and Peace and Anna Karenina. Autograph Letter Signed, 3 pp., 8½x5¼", n.p., n.d. Fine; lightly toned. A rare letter in English answering questions put to him by an unnamed person who is disillusioned in his position (possibly a man of the church) and is contemplating a change.

Tolstoy remarks on his correspondent's comments on the expulsion from the temple, and on a translation of the gospels being translated into English. He continues: "The question about your service can not be answered by me…you alone can solve this difficulty….I think that we never ought to change our life only because we find that it would be nicer to lead such or such a life, but only because we can not not to change it. And therefore as I act myself I advise the same to my friends: not to change ones life because one would like to lead another kind of life but only to care with all one's might to keep a clear understanding and conscience, not to hide from one's self the truth, and to preffess it allways…."
Estimated Value $2,000 - 3,000.
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Realized
$4,255
Lot 188
  Withdrawn Unsold
Lot 189
Whittier, John Greenleaf. 1807 -1892) American Quaker poet. Autograph Quotation Signed "John G. Whittier," 4x6¾", n.p., n.d. Light toning; neatly penned and signed. Whittier quotes another poet, in full: "'Be good, young friend, & let who will be clever, Do noble deeds not dream them all day long / And so make life, death & that vast forever / One grand sweet song.' I cannot do better than to commend the above words of an English poet, Canon Kingsley…."
Estimated Value $300 - 400.
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Realized
$173
Lot 190
Zola, Emile (1840 1902) French novelist; major exponent of naturalism; famous for his role in the Dreyfus Affair. Autograph Quotation in French Signed: "Il est quelque chose de pire que la bêtise: c'est l'esprit. Emile Zola," ("There is something worse than stupidity: that is wit."), in dark brown ink on a 3½x4½" card with an embossed emblem of St. Michael slaying the dragon. Light toning, else fine.
Estimated Value $300 - 500.
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Realized
$276






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