Goldberg Coins and Collectibles



Sale 23

Pre-Long Beach Coin and Currency Auction


U.S. Coins - Colonial
 
 
Lot Photo Description Realized
Lot 1227
1662 Oak Tree Twopence. PCGS graded AU-53. 10.8 grains. Deep silver-gray in color, with glossy surfaces on both sides. Struck on a slightly wavy (apparently, as made) planchet. Nicely centered on the reverse, somewhat off-center on the obverse (tree side) -- this variety is famous for being off-center. The tree is perfectly impressed, as is the date, denomination, and much of the legends. This piece compares favorably to either of the Hain Family collection coins, the best of which was also AU. Nicer examples are as scarce as hen's teeth -- PCGS reports only 9 in this grade and only 9 finer (the best being a single MS-62) (PCGS # 17) .
Estimated Value $6,500 - 7,000.
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Lot 1228
1662 Oak Tree Twopence. PCGS graded EF-40. 10.8 grains. Antique, silver-gray toning. Nicely detailed striking on a slightly wavy planchet. Not quite as nice as the Hain "AU" but on par with the other EF examples that have appeared on the market in recent years, and certainly finer than most. The 1662 Oak Tree Sixpence are a real enigma -- all five "varieties" listed by Noe (numbers 30-34) were actually struck from the same pair of dies, but reworkings and die states have been assigned different numbers. Sometimes, it's hard to tell them apart; in some tough cases, the variety numbers have been given extensions (for example, Noe 31.5 and 31.2). Nonetheless, they remain a popular and important part of our numismatic history -- the first silver pieces struck on American soil (PCGS # 17) .
Estimated Value $2,500 - 3,000.
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Realized
$1,898
Lot 1229
1662 Oak Tree Twopence. PCGS graded VF-20. 11.7 grains. Attribution difficult because of the wear on the coin, but this is most likely a Noe-30. Bright, silvery-gray with hints of lilac on some of the high points. Minor dig or flaw on the left side of the obverse and numerous micro-ticks on the reverse. Overall, a pleasing representive example of this historic Colonial issue (PCGS # 17) .
Estimated Value $2,500 - 3,000.
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Lot 1230
1652 Oak Tree Sixpence. NGC graded AU-50. 33.9 grains. Perfectly centered on a nice, round planchet (we can't say that about any of the others we've seen, including the three examples in the Hain Family Collection). With the usual bulge beneath the tree, resulting in a swath of weakness across the bottom of the obverse. Deep steel-gray toning. From an intermediate state of the dies, with the crack on the right side of the reverse visible but not heavy. The best coin in the Hain Family collection was only Extremely Fine. The only similarly graded example of which we are aware is another PCGS AU-50 from Heritage's September 1999 sale (Lot 5375). Naturally, we prefer ours.
Estimated Value $9,500 - 10,500.
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Lot 1231
1652 Pine Tree Threepence. VG-8. Struck on an uneven, wavy planchet, but the color is a nice, original, steel-gray color. These were all made from over-sized dies, so they are all off-center in one fashion or another: either one side, the other, or both. This one is a perfectly presentable example that should easily exceed our estimate.
Estimated Value $500 - 600.
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Realized
$1,323
Lot 1232
1652 Pine Tree Shilling. Large planchet. PCGS graded AU-55. 67.9 grains. The finest of the five examples from the Hain Family collection (the greatest collection of Massachusetts Silver ever assembled), where it was called "Uncirculated" and "One of the Finest Seen." Naturally, the consignor was disappointed with the grade assigned by PCGS, but that does not take away from the coin's beauty, importance, or lengthy pedigree. This coin is easily identified by the tiny edge cracks at 5:30 and 6:30 -- perhaps these are the reason for the less-than-Unc. grade? The only finer example of which we are aware is the PCGS MS-62 sold by Bowers and Merena in November 2002 (the recipient of two full pages in the catalog)! If you're serious about Massachusetts Silver, here's your chance to prove it! (PCGS # 23) .
Estimated Value $12,000 - 14,000.
S.H. & H. Chapman "Richard B. Winsor Collection", December 1895, Lot 15 - Henry Chapman "Matghew Adams Stickney Collection", June 1907, Lot 22 - Stack's "Hain Family Collection", January 2002, Lot 105.

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Lot 1233
1652 Pine Tree Shilling. Large planchet. PCGS graded AU-53. 64.8 grains. The nicer of the two Noe-9's from the Hain Family collection, where it was described as follows: "…Attractive medium silver gray in color with some very pale blue overtones. Obverse surface appears smooth and glossy, reverse a little rougher, as expected. About perfectly centered on both sides, just the tops of the letters at the top of the obverse and reverse run to or off the edge. Tree about as sharp as ever seen on an N.9. Two planchet creases, as made, only one of which has any effect on the sharpness of some letters. No important accidental damage whatsoever…" Upon examination, PCGS raised the grade from Extremely Fine to AU-53 and lowered the weight from 65.3 grains to 64.8 grains (PCGS # 23) .
Estimated Value $10,000 - 12,000.
Stack's, privately on May 12, 1987 - Stack's "Hain Family Collection", January 2002, Lot 122.

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$5,175
Lot 1234
1723 Rosa Americana Penny. PCGS graded AU-53. Golden-olive in color, with what appears to be lots of faded original color on both sides. Nicer than average planchet. Scarce in this grade -- PCGS reports only 3, with 16 finer (the best being 2 MS-62's) (PCGS # 125) .
Estimated Value $1,400 - 1,700.
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Lot 1235
1723 Wood's Hibernia Farthing. "DEI GRATIA REX". PCGS graded MS-63 Brown. Superb strike, with full details on both sides, even on the highest points. Perfect for type purposes. PCGS reports 19 in this grade, and only 14 finer (all MS-64 Brown) (PCGS # 176) .
Estimated Value $700 - 800.
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Lot 1236
1723 Wood's Hibernia Halfpenny. PCGS graded MS-63. Nice and glossy brown, with some mint luster evident on both sides, mostly in the protected areas around the lettering and devices. Housed in an old-style, green-label holder. Well struck and choice (PCGS # 180) .
Estimated Value $800 - 1,000.
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Realized
$460
Lot 1237
1723 Wood's Hibernia Halfpenny. PCGS graded AU-50. Struck on a problem free planchet. Medium reddish-brown with some violet overtones (PCGS # 180) .
Estimated Value $250 - 300.
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Lot 1238
1773 Virginia Halfpenny. Period after "GEORGIVS". PCGS graded MS-64 Brown. Glossy brown, with some mint red still visible in the protected areas. Boldly struck and well preserved. Many of these came from the Col. Mendes Cohen hoard, but those coins usually show numerous carbon spots. The absence of spots on this coin indicates that it came from some other source (PCGS # 240) .
Estimated Value $1,000 - 1,500.
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Lot 1239
1773 Virginia Halfpenny. Period after "GEORGIVS". PCGS graded MS-63 Brown. Glossy, orange-brown surfaces. Spot-free and clean (PCGS # 240) .
Estimated Value $800 - 900.
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Lot 1240
1724 Hibernia Halfpenny. PCGS graded AU-50. Stop after date. Struck from worn dies, the obverse with a light crack through GEORGIU, and a rim crack to the bust point. The reverse die appears to have been lapped, as the central definition is indistinct, and some of the harp strings are played out. Examination makes us uncertain that the color is original, as it remains slightly uneven with hints of mottling. Free of circulation problems or other detractions.
Estimated Value $400 - 500.
Benson Collection.

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Realized
$299
Lot 1241
(1672-94) London Elephant Halfpenny. Thick planchet. PCGS graded EF-40. A nicely centered example on a dark brown planchet. Small void by the elephant's rump; otherwise, the planchet is in great shape. This is one of the more popular Colonial types because of the pachyderm on the obverse (PCGS # 55) .
Estimated Value $1,200 - 1,300.
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$1,150
Lot 1242
1766 Pitt Halfpenny Token. PCGS graded AU-55. Nice, chocolate-brown color. The centering is perfect on the obverse, slightly off-center on the reverse, and the planchet is free of any noticeable problems. PCGS has graded 9 this high, with only 9 finer (the best is a single MS-66).
Pitt was a British parliamentarian who supported America in its opposition to the Stamp Act ("Taxation without representation"). Various tokens and medals (including this "Halfpenny") were struck in his honor (PCGS # 236) .
Estimated Value $3,000 - 3,800.
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Lot 1243
(c. 1779) Rhode Island Ship Medal. Wreath below ship. Copper. PCGS graded AU-50. Well struck with glossy, even reddish-brown color. Pop of 3 with 18 better, the finest being MS-62 (3 examples) (PCGS # 576) .
Estimated Value $2,000 - 2,500.
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Realized
$1,610
Lot 1244
(c. 1779) Rhode Island Ship Medal. Wreath below ship. Pewter. PCGS graded MS-62. Here's a friend of ours from our February 2001 sale of the Benson Collection, Lot 35, where it was described, in part, as follows: "Here is another outstanding example of this popular colonial issue. The surfaces are a satiny gray color and the coin boldly struck throughout. There is a mint made clip at the top of the date, visible on both sides, but it is small and unimportant…" Here is a census of those we could reasonably locate (from our September 2002 sale, Lot 38): 1). The specimen offered here from the Paul Arthur Norris Collection PCGS graded MS-64, previously from our Benson Collection Sale, 2/2001:34. Apparently tied for the Finest Known (Norris upgraded to this coin from specimen #3 below) 2). Another, not seen PCGS MS-64. 3). The Paul Arthur Norris specimen, PCGS MS-62 (plate) our Benson sale 2/2001:35. Rim clip at 4:00 o'clock on the obverse. 4). Another, not seen, PCGS graded MS-60. (probably one of those listed below). 5). Kagin's 332 sale, 2/83:1006 (plate)," AU-Uncirculated, small spot in upper right obverse field". 6). Kagin's 313 GENA Sale, 9/78:1770 (plate) "About Uncirculated-55". 7). The Parsons/Ellsworth/Garrett specimen, Bowers & Ruddy 10/80:1328 (plate) "EF or better" at $5,000. Identifiable by a small scratch above stern flag. 8). Paramount's Burnheimer Sale, 5/76:502 (plate) "AU-50 Several areas of roughness near the rims as is usually encountered on pewter pieces" at $2,050. 9). The Norweb specimen, Bowers and Merena Galleries, 10/87:1262 (plate) "EF-40, spots of corrosion" at $1,000. 10). NERCG's Commonwealth Sale, 7/77:34 (plate), "VF-35 choice surfaces and color" at $1,000. 11). The Roper specimen, Stack's 12/83:174 (plate), "VF, 3 or 4 spots of tin pest obverse". 12). New Netherlands 48th sale, 11/56:792 (no plate) "VF somewhat defective mainly about the periphery, recently obtained abroad" and almost certainly the same specimen as New Netherlands 51st sale, 6/58:183 (no plate) "VF slightly imperfect as always; edge scaly and irregular, obtained in England". 13). Robison specimen, Stack's 2/82:71 (plate). "VF holed" (PCGS # 585) .
Estimated Value $3,000 - 3,500.
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Lot 1245
(c. 1779) Rhode Island Ship Medal. No wreath. Copper. PCGS graded MS-62 Brown. PQ. One of the best strikes we've seen on a Rhode Island Ship Token, here with every port hole visible on the ship, even on the tiny ships on the back! The surfaces are a trifle dry in appearance, but these generally don't come glossy anyway. This is also one of the nicest examples available to collectors. PCGS reports 4 in this grade, 3 in MS-63, and 1 in MS-65 (PCGS # 579) .
Estimated Value $3,000 - 3,500.
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Lot 1246
1787 Immunis Columbia. Copper pattern. Fine-12. Dark brown, slightly porous surfaces. Minor planchet clip at 7:00 on the obverse. Virtually all known examples were struck on under-sized planchets, and most show only small portions of the date (as does this one). The "Redbook" notes: "This piece is believed to be a prototype for Federal coinage" but we've seen enough of these, and enough circulated examples, to believe that they were actually intended to circulate.
Estimated Value $900 - 1,000.
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Realized
$1,380
Lot 1247
1787 New Jersey. Shield outlined. AU-55. Well struck on a problem-free planchet. Uniform iridescent brown with some reddish highlights.
Estimated Value $1,400 - 1,500.
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Lot 1248
1786 Vermont. "Vermontensium". PCGS graded AU-55. Glossy brown, with some of the nicest surfaces you'll ever see on a Vermont Copper. Struck on a defective planchet, with a big void on the left side of the reverse. This prevented the metal from flowing into the deepest recesses of the dies, thus the left side of the obverse is also weak. Struck slightly off-center towards 5:00, clipping off the bottoms of the 8 and 6 of the date and the tops of QUARTA on the reverse. Such flaws are common to Vermont Coppers, so collectors usually go for the coins with nice surfaces. In that arena, this one is sure to please (PCGS # 545) .
Estimated Value $3,000 - 4,000.
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Lot 1249
(c. 1785) Bar Cent. PCGS graded AU-58. From our May 2001 sale of the Fairchild Family Trust (Lot 56), where it was described (in part) as follows: "Choice medium to light brown in color with no surface problems or handling marks worth noting. There is a tiny speck located under the center of the S on the obverse, and a couple of spots between the upper bars on the reverse. Well struck…" PCGS has graded 3 this high, with 10 graded higher (the best being an MS-66) (PCGS # 599) .
Estimated Value $4,000 - 5,000.
Richard Picker - our Fairchild Family Trust sale, May 2001, Lot 56.

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Lot 1250
"1789" Mott token. Plain edge, thick planchet. PCGS graded MS-63. Late state of the dies, with a massive cud on the upper left corner of the clock. The worn dies create the impression of wear, a false assumption on this piece, as it has no friction or color changes on the highest points. Interesting that PCGS makes no mention of the color, which is a medium, chocolate brown. Researchers believe these issues to be back dated -- they were most likely made sometime in the early 1800's. PCGS reports only 6 in this grade and only three finer (all in MS-64) (PCGS # 603) .
Estimated Value $2,000 - 2,500.
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Lot 1251
"1789" Mott token. Plain edge, thick planchet. PCGS graded MS-62. Another nice example of this variety, with traces of faded mint red (a rare occurrence) in the protected areas on the obverse. Despite the late die state, this one has a great strike and a nicely detailed clock face (PCGS # 603) .
Estimated Value $1,500 - 2,000.
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Lot 1252
(c.1792-94) Kentucky Cent. Plain edge. PCGS graded MS-64 Brown. Excellent, glossy brown surfaces, with ample traces of original mint red. Strong strike. Bright, semi-reflective luster. No finer Brown examples have been certified by PCGS (PCGS # 614) .
Estimated Value $1,000 - 1,300.
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Lot 1253
(c.1792-94) Kentucky Cent. Plain edge. PCGS graded MS-62 Brown. Pleasing, glossy surfaces and a rich, medium-brown color. Well struck to the point that even the motto on the scroll is complete and clear. These were made in England for sale to collectors -- they became known as Kentucky tokens because of the special place held by that state at the top of the pyramid on the reverse (PCGS # 614) .
Estimated Value $1,000 - 1,250.
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Lot 1254
(c.1792-94) Kentucky Cent. Plain edge. PCGS graded AU-58 (PCGS # 614) .
Estimated Value $600 - 700.
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Realized
$690
Lot 1255
(c.1792-94) Kentucky Cent. Plain edge. PCGS graded EF-45. Dark, olive brown, with scattered traces of tan color (PCGS # 614) .
Estimated Value $350 - 400.
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Lot 1256
(c.1792-94) Kentucky Cent. Lettered edge, "LANCASTER". PCGS graded MS-64 Red. Fully struck on both sides and lustrous with fading mint red color throughout. Popular colonial issue. Pop of 34 with 7 higher by a point.
Estimated Value $1,500 - 1,700.
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Lot 1257
1794 Franklin Press token. PCGS graded AU-58. Pleasing, orange-brown surfaces. From an early state of the dies, with no break or cud in the printing press. Struck in England, but popular with American collectors because of the obvious reference to one of our earliest and most famous printers, Benjamin Franklin (PCGS # 630) .
Estimated Value $600 - 700.
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Realized
$690
Lot 1258
1794 Franklin Press token. PCGS graded AU-55. Dark chocolate brown in color in the fields of the obverse and reverse, lighter color on the devices. Boldly struck and with only a few minor handling marks. One lighter spot on the left obverse field, and with some very minor areas of dark green patina in the obverse lettering. Well centered and preserved.
Estimated Value $500 - 600.
Purchased from Ira S. Reed in July 1944, for $2, as "V. Fine"; Ex Benson Collection.

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Realized
$489
Lot 1259
1795 Talbot, Allum & Lee Token Cent. PCGS graded Proof 65 Brown. Glittering Proof surfaces and exceptionally bold details. Large quantities of these were struck in England for shipment to the Talbot, Allum & Lee company of New York, where they were used as combined money and advertising pieces. Apparently, the Birmingham Mint produced some special Proof issues, which are vastly different in appearance from the regular issue pieces. This is one such piece, and it's a Gem! Extremely Rare! PCGS reports 5 in this grade, with none better (PCGS # 90640) .
Estimated Value $1,500 - 2,000.
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Realized
$4,025
Lot 1260
1783 Washington "Georgius Triumpho" token. PCGS graded AU-55. A surprisingly nice example of this piece, but struck from perhaps the latest state of the dies we've ever encountered. Glossy brown, lustrous, and conservatively graded (Psst! -- the holder is from the older-generation with a green label). PCGS has not yet graded a Mint State example of this token. Their best are 8 AU-55's and 5 AU-58's. Thus, this is one of the finest examples available to collectors (PCGS # 664) .
Estimated Value $1,500 - 1,700.
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Lot 1261
1783 Washington token. Large military bust. PCGS graded AU-55. Glossy, mottled brown surfaces, with an interesting two-tone effect in the obverse fields. These tokens were made in the early 1800's. The back-dating to 1783 is merely a recognition of the peace marking the end of the Revolutionary War. Dies by Thomas Wells Ingram, of the Soho Mint in England (PCGS # 667) .
Estimated Value $750 - 850.
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Lot 1262
1783 Washington token. Copper restrike, engrailed edge. PCGS graded Proof 65 Brown. Superb strike and gorgeous, glossy surfaces with plenty of faded mint red still remaining. These were restrikes made circa 1860, and as Breen suggests: "Whatever their actual date of striking, all have remained in demand among collectors ever since the 1860s." (PCGS # 685) .
Estimated Value $700 - 900.
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Realized
$1,035
Lot 1263
1791 Washington Cent. Small eagle. PCGS graded AU-50. A pleasing high grade example of this popular Washington piece. Dark brown in color, with nice surfaces that are a little on the dry side of glossy. Minor rim bruise at 8:00 on the reverse and two small cuts in the clouds above the eagle. In a very real sense, this is one of the first U.S. Pattern coins -- it was struck in England in the hopes that the maker (Obadiah Westwood) could provide coins to America under contract. The maker chose a flattering portrait of Washington for the obverse and an heraldic eagle for the reverse (a stylistic modification of the Great Seal created by Congress in 1782 and adopted by the new U.S. government in 1789). Unfortunately, Westwood didn't know with whom he was dealing -- Washington opposed having his portrait on coins, neither did he like the idea of a contract coinage. So, despite the high quality of the coins, they were rejected in favor of the development of a sovereign American Mint and purely American coins (PCGS # 705) .
Estimated Value $1,400 - 1,500.
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Lot 1264
1793 Washington Halfpenny. Ship reverse, lettered edge. PCGS graded AU-55. Medium, chocolate brown surfaces. The obverse fields appear rough, but we've seen this before on other examples of this type and we suspect it has more to do with the late state of the dies than with any post-striking damage. Clearly, the reverse is in a very late state, with a big, bulging lip on the lower right and the N of WASHINGTON heavily clashed into the die to the right of the Y of HALFPENNY. Like many of the Washington pieces, this was made in England for consumption by collectors fascinated with the new American president (PCGS # 734) .
Estimated Value $850 - 950.
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Lot 1265
1795 Washington Halfpenny. Grate reverse, large buttons, lettered edge. PCGS graded MS-62 Brown. Mottled, dark and light brown surfaces. Excellent, problem-free surfaces and a nice strike (even the details on the normally weak epaulet can be seen. PCGS has graded only 2 examples finer than the piece offered here. Made in London, England for consumption by collectors both there and in America, where Washington-related items have always been popular. This variety derives its nickname from the comforting hearth on the reverse (PCGS # 743) .
Estimated Value $3,000 - 3,500.
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Lot 1266
(1795) Washington "Liberty and Security" Penny. PCGS graded MS-63 Brown. A wonderful, glossy example of this big, heavy copper coin. The surfaces are medium brown, consisting entirely of wholly converted mint red. The left side of the obverse has some internal lamination flaws and another on the rim at 9:00 (above the G and O of GEORGE). Breen claims that these were made in response to news that the U.S. Mint was failing, thus renewing hopes for a private contract coinage. However, the excessive weight of these pieces (300+ grains, compared to 208 grains for a U.S. Large Cent) did not mesh with the American coinage system in any way.
PCGS reports 9 in this grade, 7 in MS-64, 3 in MS-65, and none finer (PCGS # 767) .
Estimated Value $2,500 - 3,500.
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Lot 1267
Washington "Success" medal. Large, with reeded edge. PCGS graded AU-50. Olive brown, with darker fields. The reverse actually features some original silvering which helps to confirm the AU-50 grade. In normal use, these are difficult to grade because the strike is normally weak and inconsistent. However, this is a nice example that fully deserves the assigned grade. In AU-50, PCGS reports only 5 examples, with only 12 finer (PCGS # 780) .
Estimated Value $1,500 - 2,000.
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